Discussion Topic 5 – Youth and human rights



When we are young, we are figuring out who we are and our place in the world. What we experience during these formative years shapes our views about ourselves and others. Among other things, we are influenced by the beliefs of our family, our friends, and the environment around us, including an increasingly pervasive media landscape. Ultimately we determine our own path, but the story of our youth leaves an imprint we carry for a lifetime.

When I talk to young people today, I am often inspired by their naturally inclusive nature, their compassion for those in need, and their willingness to consider the views of others. I also know some young people struggle to be accepted for who they are. Whether it is about gender, sexual identity, race, economic status or other factors, their struggle is often silent and invisible. We must do better.

I recently received some handwritten human rights feedback from grade 12 students. One remarkable submission spoke about the student’s sexual orientation and the feeling of not being able to discuss it with their parents. To that student, and all young people in this position, I hear your voice and I stand with you. My hope is that the new B.C. Human Rights Commission can work to normalize these types of conversations and help young people navigate their way into adulthood, knowing they are exactly who they are meant to be.

How do you feel your views on human rights and discrimination compare to the way you were raised? What youth-centred issues do you think the new Human Rights Commission should focus on? And how do you think a Human Rights Commission should interact with youth?

– Ravi Kahlon, Parliamentary Secretary for Multiculturalism & Sport

Sort

Search

23 responses to “Discussion Topic 5 – Youth and human rights

    User avatar
    [-] Norah

    This is such a broad issue to respond to. I would like to start with education for children and youth. In particular teaching methods that do not work for 25% of kids in school. I worked in ADULT literacy with adults who were moved through the school system in our province and finished school without the ability to read and write. As I understand it, education is a human right. Our province teaches teachers in one method of teaching children and teens. It is called whole language and has been the one method used for years. Unfortunately it only works for approximately 75% of the children/teens. I ran a adult tutoring program in Orton Gillingham methods (Phonics and multisensory) of teaching as well as whole language and taking into consideration emotional learning. I taught bc teachers and special education teachers who came to volunteer to tutor adults. The response I experienced with the teacher was overwhelming. They did not receive enough training to teach phonics in class and therefore did not feel confident or competant to teach it. The damage caused to children, teens and adults because they can’t read and write in everyday life and in school is overwhelming. I could go on more regarding the topic of literacy and education in BC . I have just outlined the problem.

    0
    0
    permalink
    User avatar
    [-] Pamela

    I think first and foremost the SAFETY of Human life of any age should be protected from all angles , food , workplace hazards , environmental health dangers etc . Children are the most vulnerable as health standards for example of RF Radiation are rated for a 200 lb human where does that leave children !!

    0
    0
    permalink
Comments are closed.