Question 1: What does active transportation mean to you and how does it fit into your life?



The Province has been supporting active transportation since the mid 1990’s when it first launched the Bike to Work program in 1994 and provided funding for Cycling Network planning in 1995. More recently, communities across the province have benefited from BikeBC grants that were initiated in 2008.

Communities around the province have also independently embraced active transportation by developing specific active transportation plans or including active transportation in their official community plans (OCP). Today, governments, communities, environmental groups and community organizations are all embracing active transportation. The active transportation conversation will build on this work and provide a provincial framework to advance active transportation throughout the province.

The development of the framework for active transportation is a collaborative process, involving a wide range of public, private, non-profit and Indigenous community participants.  Active transportation will support the Province’s three key commitments to British Columbians: to make life more affordable, to deliver the services people count on, and to build a strong, sustainable economy.

All feedback received will result in a provincial approach with measures to support new infrastructure, education and incentive programs, and safety improvements for people using active transportation.

Question 1: What does active transportation mean to you and how does it fit into your life?

 

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884 responses to “Question 1: What does active transportation mean to you and how does it fit into your life?

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    [-] Brennan

    Active transportation to me means walking, running, cycling and taking public transportation (buses/skytrains). I love taking these means of transportation as it means that I get to be more active than if I were to drive, and you become more in touch with your communities and can have the opportunity to have meaningful interactions with other people. I take public transportation during the work week and more physical means on weekends and holidays.

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    [-] Michael

    “Active transportation” – walking, cycling – is laudable and should be facilitated, but really it should be seen as part of the larger goal of getting people out of fossil fuel powered vehicles.

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    [-] Lorelei

    I enjoy walking, xc skiing and bike riding. It would be great to be able to safely use those activities for transportation in addition to as recreation. Because our roads are rural there are no shoulders that make it reliably safe. Weekends do not have logging trucks on the roads so walking and biking is safer. Often , I will chose to drive to a walking path or a bike riding location so that I can participate in the activity safely.

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    [-] Meghan

    It means being able to SAFELY and COMFORTABLY get around by foot, bike, and public transit. It is my daily choice, my main mode of travel, sometimes the only way to fit physical activity into my day.

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    [-] S.

    Active transportation means the ability to walk or cycle safely from my place of residence to schools, shops and services. It means slower vehicular traffic and pedestrians and cyclists having priority on separated facilities, with plenty of benches, rest stops, linkages for people of all forms of ability.

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    [-] Oriano

    Active transportation means easy and safe accessible public transit and walkable streets. BC Transit should get sufficient funding to enable increased bus service frequency. Bus riders should not have to wait for more then 10 minutes before the next bus comes along. Also, walkable sidewalks should have priority over bike lanes given that many more people walk than ride a bike.

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    [-] Kim

    Walking to a nearby bus stop that has regular service to downtown and local centres. Being able to take my daughter for walks in the evening to enjoy nature and maybe pick up a few groceries.

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    [-] Elizabeth

    Active Transportation is what I do as I don’t have a car. I love riding my bike. We need more cycling paths in the city.

    I also go to the Gulf Islands a lot. Making cycling safe on the Gulf Islands has been very slow. Every time road work is done there cycling paths should be added, not just on new roads. We need to be encouraging alternative transportation on the islands where transport options are very limited if one doesn’t have a car.

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    [-] Sarah

    For me active transportation is getting anywhere without using my car. It means walking or cycling to the grocery store when my list is short, combining my bike with the bus to make the commute to work a couple of times a week, and walking out to dinner or for a coffee in my neighbourhood. I’m lucky to live at the edge of a single family zone that’s adjacent to all of those places, including a major transit hub. For most of my city (Langley Township) those are not practical options at the moment.

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    [-] Robert

    Active Transportation means traffic delays with funds to alleviate those delays constantly siphoned off for unused bike lane infrastructure. The bike lanes have caused a mindset of moral superiority in bicyclists which translates to increased unsafe road use as well.

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    [-] Kari

    Active transportation means a permanent, well-planned, connected and funded set of options that make up a “mobility chain” (ie. multi-modal) of walking/wheeling, cycling, ride-share, and public transit/public ferry systems.
    In my experience this has meant the ability for all citizens to enjoy these mainly car-free, healthier ways of getting around in our neighbourhoods, cities, regions, provinces, and nation. It requires integrated, reasonable and co-operative planning amongst a variety of stakeholders including residents, political representatives, gov’t staff/policy-makers, business, and non-profits making choices for our shared, sustainable and much healthier present and future as we move away from dependence on fossil fuels and ensure that accessible networks are in reach of most/all residents/citizens.
    Active transportation necessarily includes short trips for goods and services, commuting between work and home/appointments, and for those in more rural communities, public transit sufficient to assist with travelling long distances without having to rely on SOVs.
    It also includes being able to travel as tourists in our own province using an inter-connected, transferable, affordable set of facilities and services like the North Sea Cycle Network, which I have been encouraging various provincial reps to consider for almost 20 years now: https://www.cycletourer.co.uk/cycletouring/nscrinfo.shtml
    This type of “grassroots” sustainable tourism here in BC could attract not only local and regional tourists, but also national and international travellers/visitors connecting with our national rail network.
    If we build it, they WILL come 🙂

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    [-] Laurie

    As a busy, working parent I don’t seem to find a way to make time to exercise. I would love the opportunity to have a more active commute to and from work as a way to incorporate exercise into my daily life and to model that for my children. Additionally, I would also love safer, connected bike or walking routes to school so my kids could actively commute as well.

    As a family, it would be great to leave the car at home on the weekends and be able to get around with a mix of bikes, connected corridors and transit.

    Active transportation to me means an opportunity to have better physical and mental health through physical activity and social connection (and perhaps prevent some health issues as I age) and stronger bonds within our family, being able to do something and get somewhere together, rather than my kids being passively driven around.

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    [-] Elaine

    Active transportation to me means clean moving. Whether on a bicycle, walking, or in a bus, it means that I have to put in some effort, which has a net benefit on my health. We’re so dependent on car culture that active transportation has lost its meaning.

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    [-] Trevor

    Transportation that requires physical effort and benefits a person’s health and fitness. In my life, this involves a bicycle for commuting to and from work.

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    [-] Alannah

    I work in the industry of active transportation. personally, I do not own a car so I depend on safe walking facilities, cycling lanes or car share to get around. To me, active transportation means to me being able to have a mode of transportation that is safe, convenient and vibrant. I have transitioned from being a commuter on transit in Ontario to being able to walk to work here on the island. This has changed my quality of life greatly and I hope for most people that they can commute in a way that makes their day, not ruins it.

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    [-] Karen

    Active Transportation is walking and cycling. To me, it also includes public transit when you can’t walk or bike. I am fortunate to be able Choose to Live where I can walk and bike for all my errands, shopping, appointments etc. I recently retired, but when I worked I also rode my bike to work. It’s easier than some may think, it’s a mindset, and once established, feels really good and just makes sense. : )

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    [-] Chris

    It is both a mode of commuting and leisure activity. I ride my bike to work minimum three times per week, often every day during the summer months. On weekends, I am up in the trails.

    As a transportation planner, I also recognize that providing safe, convenient active transportation facilities, such as AAA bike networks and multi-use paths is important in meeting GHG targets and providing for a strong, sustainable economy.

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    [-] M.

    To me, active transportation options mean better independence, mobility, wellness, and hope for the future.

    Active transportation is a significant share of my overall transportation but not as much as I would like it to be. Increases in transit capacity, frequency, reliability, connectivity, and affordability would help make it possible for me to choose walking in combination with transit (i.e. one way of a round trip or as backup option) instead of trips where I currently need someone to drive to me, drive me to my destination and back, and drive away.

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    [-] Doug

    Active Transportation means being able to safely travel by non-motorized means to locations within my community and to more distant locations outside the community.

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    [-] Mike

    – Active transportation is an excellent way to build healthy and sustainable communities by:
    -including exercise in our daily routines—not everyone has time, money, or desire to go to the gym; movement should just be part of what we do
    -it takes cars off the road which reduces congestion, pollution, and reliance on fossil fuels
    -trails, pathways, and sidewalks have a smaller footprint and cost than roads. Less pavement, signage, fewer traffic control measures and patrols. It could save taxpayers and the government a lot of money.
    -encouraging more interaction amongst members of a community. By getting out of our cars, we are more likely to engage with our neighbours. More people out also make communities safer.
    I bike to work on average 2-3 days per week. For part of my commute, I ride on sidewalks because the road is too dangerous. I could walk but not usually enough time.

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    [-] Phillipa

    Active transport means the luxury of being able to complete most day to day tasks by walking or cycling instead of driving. This includes going to and from work, appointments, moving kids around, shopping and more. It’s something I have been able to achieve easily where I live, as we have a dedicated walk/cycle path that allows people to ride or move around safe from traffic most seasons of the year. I have recently brought an e-bike which will allow me to do more tasks eg bigger shopping expeditions.
    To make the shift away from the car, it’s helpful to have good, safe infrastructure focused on pedestrians and cyclists and good equipment eg a bike that allows you to carry out the tasks as well as with a car.

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    [-] Eleni

    Active transportation means freedom, and prioritizing active transportation means a more equitable (whether walking, rolling or cycling) access to that freedom. Making it viable means making it safe/accessable, attractive/pleasant, and convenient. It’s not just a pleasant activity (though it can be pleasant with the right infrastructure), it’s actually a(and often the most) viable and practical direct way to get around.
    Because I’m lucky to rent an apartment near the core of Vancouver, cycling has viably become my primary mode of transport year round – whether to work or shops or to visit friends and family.
    As a diabetic, it keeps me healthy, and in the gloom of winter it is also a boost for my mental health. It means that I don’t need to spend a cent to get to where I want to go (though it has meant a bit more local shopping as I’m more likely to stop by shops that catch my eye as I move through the city.) It collapses distances, allowing efficient (mostly congestion free) movement at speed while allowing me a newfound intimate connection with the sights and even the very topography of each neighbourhood I pedal through.

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    [-] Michael

    Active transportation includes walking, cycling, and light electric vehicles (LEVs) such as electric bicycles, electric skateboards, electric unicycles, electric scooters, and more. I use one of these modes to get to work, depending on the day, with the exception of snowy days when I take the bus. I’d love to see the legal limbo around LEVs be removed, i.e., they should be allowed on bike paths and low-traffic streets.

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    [-] Peter

    My main concern about active transportation is safety. The lack of safe infrastructure prevents a lot of people from engaging in active transportation, In West Vancouver, where I live, we need more sidewalks and protected bike lanes.

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    [-] Peter

    My main mode of transportation is by bicycle, but I also do a lot for walking. Cycling is fast and efficient. I don’t have to deal with traffic congestion or finding a parking place. I always know exactly how much time it will take me to get to a destination, because I don’t get delayed by traffic congestion. Cycling and walking are good for my health and like many cyclists, I am not overweight. I am 78 years old and don’t take any medications. Furthermore, cycling is good for the environment, causing no air pollution or release of greenhouse gases. I love the outdoors and feel very connected to the environment while I am cycling. I find it exhilarating. Finally, it is a very inexpensive mode of transportation.

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    [-] Tracy

    Question 1
    Active transportation is the ability to get to one place to another in a way that is good for the environment , the individual and the community. To connect with nature and your neighbors by walking, biking or reliable community transportation systems.
    With in a reasonable distance and time lines.
    Not having to commute 3 hours a day because you can’t affort to live where you work.

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    [-] L.

    I stopped being a car owner 3 yrs ago and am mostly happy that I did for a variety of reasons. Regardless, I mainly use public transport and walking every single day but would use my electric bike more if there was a dedicated and safe space to use it.
    Our city/town infrastructures are not safe for alternatives to a car. Sidewalks are too narrow and broken for walking, no buffer between speeding traffic and alternatives. Home owners have spreading landscaping obstructing walkways and causing them to be increasingly narrower and pushing walkers closer to the road.
    Bike lanes that are wide enough for e-bikes with barriers from car traffic. Bike lanes and sidewalks need to be wider.

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    [-] Derek

    Major concern is cars being driven in a dangerous manner. Enforcement appears to be almost non-existent (red lights, stop signs, speed limits, pedestrian right of way, and one metre clearance for cyclists).

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