Question 1: What does active transportation mean to you and how does it fit into your life?



The Province has been supporting active transportation since the mid 1990’s when it first launched the Bike to Work program in 1994 and provided funding for Cycling Network planning in 1995. More recently, communities across the province have benefited from BikeBC grants that were initiated in 2008.

Communities around the province have also independently embraced active transportation by developing specific active transportation plans or including active transportation in their official community plans (OCP). Today, governments, communities, environmental groups and community organizations are all embracing active transportation. The active transportation conversation will build on this work and provide a provincial framework to advance active transportation throughout the province.

The development of the framework for active transportation is a collaborative process, involving a wide range of public, private, non-profit and Indigenous community participants.  Active transportation will support the Province’s three key commitments to British Columbians: to make life more affordable, to deliver the services people count on, and to build a strong, sustainable economy.

All feedback received will result in a provincial approach with measures to support new infrastructure, education and incentive programs, and safety improvements for people using active transportation.

Question 1: What does active transportation mean to you and how does it fit into your life?

 

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596 responses to “Question 1: What does active transportation mean to you and how does it fit into your life?

    User avatar
    [-] Greg

    I am Bike commuter, traveling about 17km each way, 3-5 times per week. I just want the road to be wide enough that I do not get squeezed out, and no parked cars so the risk of dooring is removed. Shared use bike paths are useless to me, and are very dangerous as it creates conflicts with pedestrians and increased risk of collision at intersections when transitioning from the bike path to the road. I want my active transportation experience to be safe and efficient. No one asks a car driver to get out and walk, so it should be also for cyclists.

    User avatar
    [-] Sophie

    It means being free and able to go wherever I want walking and biking, without being worried or scared about roads/traffic conditions.
    It means being able to walk in a city while having a conversation (noise pollution is reduced); not wearing a scarf or a mask because of fumes; being able to navigate a bus/subway system easily with information provided at stops and stations. It also means pedestrian streets and squares.
    Active transportation is very important to me and play a huge factor in my general happiness – mental health. I use active transportation every day, and a simple extended sidewalk with grass and trees makes the experience so much better than an all paved narrow one. I believe community has achieved active transportation excellence when people go outside just to stroll around, not to go to a place in particular. When the built environment is green, friendly and safe, then everyone is happy to get out and use active transportation.

    User avatar
    [-] Diane

    The main challenge is the lack of cycling paths that make it safe to ride. Cycling routes need to be separated and protected from both cars and pedestrians with dogs, kids and buggies. There have been numerous recent deaths on our roads in North Vancouver/West Vancouver for this very reason.

    User avatar
    [-] Jordan

    Active Transportation means not using a vehicle, rather, a mode that relies to some degree on a person’s own power. I am trying to minimize the amount I drive as much as possible by cycling wherever possible / reasonable.

    User avatar
    [-] Rachel

    To me it means getting around in way other than my car (public transit does not exist in my area). So this means using my own power (walk or bike) or my horse.

    User avatar
    [-] Krista

    Active Transportation is a part of my everyday life as I commute to work by bike throughout the year. I rely on it to keep me fit and healthy. I also use that time to decompress from my work day before going home.

    User avatar
    [-] Paulo

    The hills of north vancouver and the hills of Bowen island prevent easy use of bikes and strollers. The lack of sidewalks on Bowen

    User avatar
    [-] Paulo

    My 6 year old has a physical disability. Active transportation means knowing there will be no barriers preventing her from : getting onto a side street, getting onto a curb, playing in playground, accessing a steep road.

    User avatar
    [-] Robbie

    Having shared use (wide lanes), or designated multi-use pathways (separated from traffic) throughout corridors that go from one end of my community (Nelson) to the other and that connect all of the highly used amenities, i.e. community centre, parks, grocery stores, eateries and cafes.

    Ideally these are built so that children and adults can use them safely to prevent accidents between vehicles and more active forms of transportation.

    User avatar
    [-] Will

    The biggest challenge is the infrastructure is not there to support active transportation. Cycling infrastructure in most cities other than Vancouver proper is inadequate. Cyclist risk their lives moving about in infrastructure designed for motor vehicles only. Many roads have no shoulders for pedestrians or cyclists. The provincial government should not fund roads that cannot accommodate multiple modes of transportation. Similarly funding should cease for multi-use infrastructure. For example the Spirit trail in North Vancouver is a big failure in that the infrastructure works only when lightly used.
    Imagine if we built our sewer or water infrastructure that way. We need to look at cities and villages in Norway and the Netherlands to see how to design infrastructure for multiple modes of transportation, active and passive, private and public. We’re operating in the dark ages in BC and politicians and transportation specialists need to get serious about their responsibility to provide safe, sustainable and cost effective transportation alternatives.

    User avatar
    [-] CATHIE

    Being assured of being able to load my bike on a bus if the trip has become too long. I would prefer to ride my bike to go places but the round trip might be more than I bargained for.

    User avatar
    [-] Laurel

    Biking to work or school allows me to get outside and be active, which helps my mental and physical health. I have a busy schedule during my Masters program, so commuting by bike allows me to fit in exercise to my weekly routine.

    User avatar
    [-] Carlos

    I feel like the government has a disconnected approach and implementation. Stuck and focusing still on cars, and is not treating bikes as main transportation. Most solutions are still an after-thought. Much like the cycle paths and routes, which are also disjointed and scary to ride with sections riding along with cars and trucks.

    When I move to Poco, I cant take my bike to Burnaby, where I work. If only the Skytrain allows bikes during rush hour. If only there are fast routes with no cars or less cars.

    There are also no incentives for people to start taking cycling as an option for commutes. I envy those Tesla buyers, who gets an incentive… when they are not as green as biking to work.

    User avatar
    [-] Carlos

    Right now I bike to work because I live just 8 km away from work. I enjoy it even on winters because I have a safe bike routes and path where there are no cars. However, thinking about it, I plan to move to another another city in the next year or so. Biking is no longer going to be an option, but can be feasible with the following;

    – Safer and farther networks of routes where there are no cars or less cars.
    – Skytrain should have a cart for bikes and allowed even on rush hours.
    – Provide incentives to individuals who uses their bike to work.

    If the government are paying thousands of $ for buyers of electric cars, which is not a true green machine, I feel we are promoting the wrong message. My health was deteriorating, until I started biking, my doc said that my vital signs are healthy again.

    User avatar
    [-] Lisa

    Q1: Active transportation to me means designated safe and sensible bicycle routes from Nelson’s north shore to and in the city of Nelson. I use my e bike for commuting to town 7 months of the year; i.e. this replaces our car. Walking in town (vs. multiple parking searches) is part of active transportation to me too.

    Q2: The shoulders on Hwy. 3 are good, but need swept in the spring (which is occuring). In town is where designated routes are needed. Plus awareness and educational signs and council support for bikes and walkers would help. The challenges are mainly city biking dangers and not having enough convenient bike racks in town. Another challenge is bus bike racks that accommodate e bikes. I know this stresses bus drivers.

    User avatar
    [-] Tania

    I support any initiative that makes it easier for BCers to not have to own and store their own car. I spend a lot of time in LA and I don’t own a car there. I use Uber pool which takes cars off the road every time a second person joins the ride which I feel awesome about. I also use electric scooter shares for shorter distances which is amazing. I’m very sad that BC is so behind on these modern solutions.

    User avatar
    [-] Jenny

    Active Transportation means that all people can move about using their choice of transportation in a safe and efficient way. This includes walking, cycling, and on assisted devices. It means that our focus is not just on cars for transportation and it depends on good public transit as well.

    User avatar
    [-] Hugh

    I commute by ebike 40 km’s each day and ride regularly on the weekends. Victoria’s bicycle infrastructure definitely needs to be improved, especially to make it safer to cycle with children.

    User avatar
    [-] J

    Active transport is affordable as well as creates happiness and more wellbeing in community members.

    User avatar
    [-] Andrew

    It is everything, it is how I move to complete daily tasks. I walk to visit shops and services, make appointments, visit friends, and patronize local businesses.

    User avatar
    [-] Jim

    Bike routes (whether separate facilities or “shoulder riding”) that are direct and kept clear of garbage, sand, snow, illegally parked vehicles, etc.

    User avatar
    [-] Alaina

    Active transport means walking, cycling, scooting, skate boarding, basically being self-propelled. It fits into our lives with cycling commuting to work and school, and sometimes to the library and grocer.

    User avatar
    [-] Richard

    Active transportation for me means riding my bike to work, for shopping, and general transport up to about 30 or 40 km round trip. Also, walking to nearby amenities within a couple of km. I hate being stuck in traffic, and looking for parking. Driving is great in the country, but in a dense city I feel trapped inside a car. On my bike I can zip around unhindered, enjoying fresh air and exercise, and get free parking.

    User avatar
    [-] Mitchell

    Active Transportation as phrased means biking or walking or some other self propelled transit. I think the flaw in the way that it is talked about and planned is emphasizing the active component of it. To be effective as a strategy it needs to be faster, more convenient and cheaper than driving. That would make it passively the best and easiest choice to make. To achieve this, things need to be close together and in high density. In my mind this is much more a question of zoning and building code than it is a question of bike lanes. That said wide sidewalks and slow traffic are required to make biking and walking feel safe and enjoyable. That means narrow traffic lanes – 10’ lets say.

    User avatar
    [-] Monica

    I’m a huge proponent of active transportation for many reasons:
    1) Non-fossil fuel burning ways of commuting reduce greenhouse gases, and fits in with Canada’s Pan-Canadian Framework and efforts towards achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement
    2) Cycling or walking to work, run errands, etc, reduces emissions that impact air quality (NOx, PM)
    3) Cycle and walking paths have a smaller surface area than roads, highways, and parking spaces – using more cycle paths, less roads, parking spaces, etc will increase impermeable surfaces and reduce urban pollution due to run-off.
    4) Physical Health – we sit around way too much and active transportation reduces obesity and heart disease
    5) Mental Health – aside from safety issues with cars, my cycle-commute brings stress relief and is often a joy, no matter what the weather
    6) Community – I look forward to a day where I spend more time waving hello to fellow AT-commuters rather than dodging cars

    User avatar
    [-] Donna

    I like to ride my bike into town instead of driving, but I don’t do it a lot in winter due to inclement weather, icy roads, salt (which is tough on bikes) and poor visibility. I bike a lot more in summer, though a lack of paved shoulders and alternate connector paths makes it challenging. Better routes are needed, far better support from MOTI (which views its mandate as making the province safe for cars), and public education that bicycles are transportation, not toys.

    User avatar
    [-] Bill

    Efficient, clean, healthy, enjoyable freedom to move.

    User avatar
    [-] Mirna

    I am not able to cycle or walk extensively due to medical condition so my comment is as a participant in traffic. I believe that it would make for safer conditions on the road if cyclists are to use less busy streets through residential areas. Is there a study that evaluates the ROI on current cycling lanes that have largely contributed to more congestion on busier routes? What repercussions are there for cyclist who do not abide by traffic regulations yet choose to participate in traffic?

    User avatar
    [-] Farrell

    At the age of 65 I live off-the-grid and 11km from my nearest local village. I rely on my bicycle to commute to and from the nearest village whenever the weather allows.

    User avatar
    [-] L

    There is no transit near my work I travel 39kmsmeach way and have to drive for my work.

    I would love the option of working from home to minimise my reliance on my personal vehicle, even one day a week would cut my commuting by 20%.

    I am a unionised government e,player and hence not permitted to work from home. Systematic changes in attitude to work need to occur this isn’t just about active transportation but a wholesale review of work and commute practices.

    User avatar
    [-] Darrel

    To me, active transportation means the safety of protected bike lanes and a well balanced cycling infrastructure coupled with enforcing laws against unlawful motorists. It means clearing the snow off of bike lanes and sidewalks instead of piling snow off of the roads onto bike lanes and sidewalks for the convenience of the motorist. Active transportation is where governments make it a priority to force citizens to depend less on cars by making it less convenient for motorists and more convenient for pedestrian’s and cyclists by taking action on a better active transportation infrastructure and safety plan rather than studying it to death and doing nothing in the end. Lower speed limits for cars in the city, coupled with enforcement of driving infractions along with higher fines for those infractions (especially distracted driving), less parking, more pedestrian only streets and better active transportation safety will also increase active transportation goers.

    User avatar
    [-] Brenda

    We live in a community that has a lot of hills. Though I have looked at the e-bikes I have not made the decision to purchase one. I am hesitant to spend the large amount of money for something I am not sure I would commit to using. I would like to be able to rent an electric bicycle within my community so I could use it when I wanted. If I were to find that I really enjoyed riding it I would purchase one.

    User avatar
    [-] Brenda

    Active transportation is a way for people to interact within smaller communities. It provides an opportunity for people to shop within a shorter distance. It provides more interaction with community members. It forces a good energy upon anyone who gets out to get active which is contagious and will spread throughout the neighbourhood.

    User avatar
    [-] Mike

    Active transportation means being able to get out on my bike to go to the places I need to go, to run the errands I need to run, or just to get out and enjoy a ride. It should not be stressful. It should not be the single most life-threatening thing I do on a regular basis.

    User avatar
    [-] Roland

    Active transportation means utilizing self propel modes of transportation to accomplish my daily tasks such as shopping, meeting friends or attend meetings. We walk or bike as much as possible. Since we live in a very hilly town it a challenge at times to walk in winter with icy roads. On those occasions we choose the car instead of possibly going to physio. For people with some disabilities this town remains difficult to be active in winter.

    User avatar
    [-] Matthew

    Active transportation to me is the ideal way I want to move about my city. It means taking a bike to shop and run errands. It means walking to my dr. appointments. It means convenience for parking a bike and making multiple stops in one trip. It means being free of the burden of guilt that a motor vehicle brings me. I feel Guilt for polluting, creating noise and contributing to the level of hazardous the road environment creates.
    Active transportation means more walk-able city streets and a more relaxed pace of life in the city. Opportunities for casual social interactions on the streets.
    It means safer streets for all users. Lower motor vehicle speed limits, streets closed to cars, larger walking spaces, better intersection design, scramble crosswalks are all features that can help active transportation thrive.
    I love bike lanes.
    The economics of owning and operating a car a abysmal. The strain on infrastructure and the social costs keep mounting. I think active transportation is the way for society to move away from the automobile-centric society and towards a safer, more appealing, and healthy era of multi-modal transportation

    User avatar
    [-] E

    Active transportation is extremely important to me. It means that people can get around to work, school errands, and recreation without needing to rely on automobiles, and do so in a safe, accessible and healthy way. I grew up in a totally car-dependent household and neighbourhood, but did not have a car after moving out and attending university in a bigger city. I began walking more than I ever had, and about 3 years ago I started cycling to work and for short errands. Cycling became a joy and a way to stay healthy even while busy. Now that I have moved back to a car-dependent city, I’m frustrated with the lack of infrastructure for active transportation and the dominance of cars in policy and attitudes. Active transportation is personally extremely important, but I think it’s imperative that as a society we make it more accessible and desirable, as it addresses climate change and public health issues as well.

    User avatar
    [-] Larissa

    Active Transportation is extremely important to me. It means community to work or school with a private vehicle.

    User avatar
    [-] Greg

    My daily cycle commute in the BC’s often-snowy Interior is a reprieve from stress. It sets me up for success at work. It gives me time to settle and focus my mind and to get my body prepared for being fully alive.

    User avatar
    [-] Keltie

    Active transportation means all modes of transportation that get the public out of vehicles and living a healthy lifestyle. It is extremely important to provide folks with ways in which they can commute, minimizing the use of vehicles. We all need to get to where we need to be safely. There is a need for active transportation choices to accommodate citizens of all ages; children need to get to school, parents need to get to childcare and work, we all need easy active transportation routes to services nearby. Safe active transportation routes for longer commutes need to be addressed by MOTI to encourage growth in this type of commuting, which MUST be a part of our Climate Action strategy.

    User avatar
    [-] Peter

    Active transportation contributes to my health, pleasure and vitality. Walking or cycling is my first transportation choice, supplemented by transit for part of the journey or as a potential back-up should circumstances change (bike break-down, weather change for which I’m unprepared, etc).