British Columbians have been engaged in robust conversations and consultations about species at risk for nearly a decade. In 2018 these conversations became more frequent and have gathered significant momentum.

From April through July 2018, British Columbians provided feedback to inform B.C.’s first standalone species-at-risk legislation: Indigenous nations and organizations; local governments, industry groups; professional associations; conservation groups; environmental non-governmental organizations; researchers; representatives of the hunting, trapping, and guiding sector; representatives of the tourism and recreation sector; government experts; academics; and the general public.

Summaries of each of our engagements to date are included here as follows:

  • April 2018: targeted discussions about species at risk at concurrent wildlife engagements involving 80 participants representing 50 organizations and led by both the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, and the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. Read a summary of this engagement.
  • June 2018: a collaborative, multi-day workshop with 76 key stakeholders which built on earlier one-on-one conversations. Read a summary of this engagement.
  • June – July 2018: 23 regional engagement sessions with 122 Indigenous nations and organizations, led by both the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy, and the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. Read a summary of this engagement.
  • Spring 2018: Online discussions with members of the public, which generated 3,732 site visits, 101 comments, and 13 written submissions. Read a summary of this engagement.

We thank all participants who engaged with us in 2018 and appreciate the depth and breadth of perspectives shared. The diversity of views and voices will enrich and inform the process, even if we are unable to adopt all the suggestions offered.

Next steps:

  • In spring 2019, we will release a discussion paper containing draft proposals on key themes.
  • This will be followed by more targeted engagements with Indigenous nations and organizations, stakeholders, and citizens in the spring of 2019 to discuss key themes heard to date, the opportunities and potential solutions around protecting species at risk.
  • Government anticipates publishing a policy intentions paper for proposed species-at-risk legislation in fall 2019.