4.1 Land Use Plans and Models



Land use decisions affect caribou habitat and populations, and caribou recovery actions also impact land use decisions. Wildlife managers will consider the impacts of caribou recovery actions for the caribou, First Nations, resource and other affected groups.

We will use land use models that will clearly show affected parties why decisions were made, and to assess results after actions are taken. The models will also be used to show how proposed plans might work. The models will be designed so that they can be easily understood by members of the public.

30 responses to “4.1 Land Use Plans and Models

    User avatar
    [-] Vipersmasher

    I travel from fort St James to Vernon bc every week for work. I see fences every where. Has the though be given that parhaps the Caribou cannot get over these fences thus restricting them from there full range of travel and not allow to get to traditional breeding grounds ?
    Also if motorized activities such as snowmobiling are restricted in area parts of the winter. Shouldn't helicopter activities be restricted as well ?

    User avatar
    [-] Bryce

    So long as wildlife managers make decisions based on science, not on who is screaming the loudest at what will they will loose.

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    [-] Denise

    Many of the current land use plans are already out dated. Expectations for Crown land is changing, very few landscape units have detailed recreation access plans and use is being established with little understanding of the cumulative impacts. Corporate environmental memory, if not already is retiring. Wildlife and habitats for species (other than deer and skunks) that once were there, are not seen by the new users, and as a result they do not consider the areas as habitat for quiet species.

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    [-] Onni

    There must be an immediate moratorium on new development in caribou habitat as recovery plans are being developed and finalized. If not, the recovery plans are worthless. There must be consideration for cumulative projects in an area as increasing destruction of the land and water has unintended consequences.

    User avatar
    [-] Randy

    You have spent millions on this remnant herd but fail to address the number one problem in this herds range.OLD GROWTH LOGGING!The range and habitat of this herd has been totally decimated by over logging of ALL the old growth forest that these caribou needed to survive.
    Talk all you want about snowmobilers(and other back country users)and predation by wolves,cougars ect..These factors would not even come into play if adequate undisturbed old growth habitat had been left.No attempt has been made to save the critical habitat that these caribou need to survive.The worst crime is heavy logging is still being allowed in this area as you keep giving lip service to the management of this herd with no attempt to address the real problem of habitat protection.
    I fear it is to late for this area to ever support caribou for at least 200 plus years as this is the shortest time period that will allow the habitat to recover enough to again support a viable herd of caribou.In my life time I have seen this herd go from a huntable population with an open season then to limited entry and finally full protection.None of this was due to hunting or predators it was all directly caused by wide spread uncontrolled logging.This has been repeated throughout the kootenay caribou range.
    No government,Wildlife managers or forestry managers has ever had the guts to do what it would take to save these caribou and their habitat.The conservation land trust that bought the old Darkwoods property for habitat protection for Grizzly bears and caribou are worse than the original owners for wrecking critical habitat as they continue to log and make new access into the few remaining fractured pieces of remaining habitat.
    The trees these caribou need to survive do not grow back in 80 or 100 years.These trees are from 200 to 450 years old.They may never grow back even in this time span do to the erosion of the soils from logging practices in these high country old growth forests.
    Years ago when I phoned our biologists at the time (Guy Woods) to inform him that they were going to log the last remaining stand of old growth spruce on the backside on Stag Leap park .His answer was "well thats a forestry decision".So much for integrated management practices between the various ministries that was supposed to happen under the big change to the environment ministry.The caribou herds in the Kootenays are on their way to extinction due to the loss of their critical habitat that may never recover.
    Job well done!!Grizzly bears will be next.Look at history any animal that no longer has a huntable population is on its way out.
    Keep up the good work!!!

    User avatar
    [-] Bronwen

    Caribou recovery requires a landscape-level approach over many years to be effective. The long-term
    goal should be interconnected herds: one metapopulation.
    Piecemeal approaches to habitat protection will not work. The science shows that if caribou habitat
    continues to be destroyed, caribou will not recover.
    Meaningful recovery means strong, effective protection of 100 per cent of caribou habitat at high
    elevations as defined by the 2014 Federal Recovery Strategy.

    User avatar
    [-] Maryann

    Caribou recovery requires a landscape-level approach over many years to be effective. The long-term goal should be interconnected herds: one metapopulation.
    Piecemeal approaches to habitat protection will not work. The science shows that if caribou habitat continues to be destroyed, caribou will not recover.
    Meaningful recovery means strong, effective protection of 100 per cent of caribou habitat at high elevations as defined by the 2014 Federal Recovery Strategy.
    In the Kootenays old growth logging and outdoor recreation (skiing and snow machining in particular) have fragmented habitat and driven caribou to extinction. Even in closed areas there is no enforcement and snow machines are everywhere. It's a disgrace.

    User avatar
    [-] Shannon

    Yes, for closing of habitat to the public communicate clearly. But also provide a report offenders phone number. Tell the story on the signage. Engage the citizen, tourist or resident. If back road is closed, display signage explaining the critical low numbers, dates and anticipated recovery and timeline.

    User avatar
    [-] Shannon

    Caribou recovery requires a landscape-level approach over many years to be effective. The long-term goal should be interconnected herds: one metapopulation.
    Piecemeal approaches to habitat protection will not work. The science shows that if caribou habitat continues to be destroyed, caribou will not recover.
    Meaningful recovery means strong, effective protection of 100 per cent of caribou habitat at high elevations as defined by the 2014 Federal Recovery Strategy.

    Even the comments procedure in this survey is troubling. Each individual person is asked to select their specific region and herd. But we need to connect these herd to others. Why are they seen as separate? There interconnected ranges is how they thrived before and they need that again.

    Limiting/cancelling/postponing business tenures and recreational use in the critical high elevation habitats and corridors is needed. Too much traffic spooks the caribou. Give them a refuge now so that they might recover.

    User avatar
    [-] Adam

    Land use models approach is great, and long overdue. Accessibility to the public and stakeholder groups is extremely important – hopefully the public review process can follow and improve upon what is currently done for recreational crown land tenure

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    [-] Jane

    Caribou recovery requires a landscape-level approach over many years. The long-term goal should be interconnected hers – one meta-population. No fences or barriers and no motorised sport or hunting in the area. Let nature be the balance – don't cull one population/species in preference to others and then it will eventually balance out naturally.
    Stop logging, especially of old growth forests.

    User avatar
    [-] Jan

    I believe Caribou recovery requires long tern recovery strategies especially focusing on high terrain habitat. These strategies should focus on consideration of interconnected herds, not piecemeal approaches. How can I check off a survey box that would indicate I am just concerned with my local herd.

    User avatar
    [-] Quinn

    If this is a true caribou recovery plan, then all decisions should be made with caribou recovery first and foremost. Development should never be an option or considered.

    All land should be connected, not fragmented and be protected and preserved in perpetuity. No development, no resource extraction, no logging, etc.

    User avatar
    [-] Paula

    Habitat protection is the most important element in caribou recovery: the science indicates that populations will not recover unless remaining habitat is protected. Interconnected herds should be the goal, so a comprehensive approach to habitat protection is needed.
    Land use plans need to protect 100% of high elevation caribou habitat (as defined by the 2014 Federal Recovery Strategy).

    User avatar
    [-] Verena

    I feel that all industrial and recreational activity should cease in caribou areas otherwise the caribou have no chance of recovery. Splitting them in small areas is also a bad idea as there needs to be genetic diversity.

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    [-] Yvonne

    The destruction of caribou habitat is vital to ensuring the existence of the species. In particular, habitat at high elevations as defined by the 2014 Federal Recovery Strategy must be fully protected.

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    [-] Pierre

    In a caribou recovery plan, caribous should be the main priority and we all know that destruction of their habitat is the number one cause of their decline. Patchwork after the fact reactions don't work and industrial use of these areas must be curbed to let the caribou survive is it's not too late.

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    [-] Mike

    As stated in many other comments above we need to have safe passage over highways for theses herds. The government of bc need s to put money towards these, and research needs to ensure the correct placement.

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    [-] SB

    Protected lands for the Caribou must be inter-connected. The herds must be able to move and interact and that is only way possible success.

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    [-] Alex

    Consideration is great but the caribou need priority even when protecting their habitat is expensive and disruptive to human use. Their remaining habitat needs to be considered as a whole and set off limits to resource extraction and motorized access.

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    [-] Jennifer

    Any land use plans must look at caribou recovery at a landscape-level over many years. Otherwise they will not be effective. Without this kind of meaningful habitat protection, caribou recovery will not be successful. In the long-term the populations should be connected herds for genetic diversity and population resiliency. There can be NO MORE degradation of caribou habitat. There is no reason to be cutting down old growth forest at this point. It is utterly short-sighted, and should be treated as a non-renewable resource given the hundreds of years it takes to reach that point. Protecting caribou habitat also has the added benefit of protected a myriad of other species who also depend on old-growth forests.

    User avatar
    [-] Gary

    As has been said here many times, Caribou cannot thrive in a disconnected, disrupted environment. Their survival requires government to reject all development and disturbance of their landscapes in the medium-to-long term and to decommission and effectively block all vehicular access points. As a hunter, I would happily give up my right to visit an area if I knew that everyone else was also being kept away so the Caribou can live and grow in peace.

    User avatar
    [-] Disa

    Effective caribou recovery requires an approach at the landscape level, undertaken over many years. The long-term goal should be inter-connected herds. Fragmented approaches to habitat protection will not work. The science indicates that caribou will not recover if caribou habitat continues to be destroyed.

    Meaningful recovery means strong, effective protection of 100 per cent of caribou habitat at high elevations, as defined by the 2014 Federal Recovery Strategy.

    User avatar
    [-] Trevor

    The Deep-Snow Mountain Caribou (DSC) is now facing extinction – 30% population reduction in the past decade alone, with considerably more decline now loaded into the system. This being the case, I hope you will refrain from viewing your constituency as 'stakeholders' in the narrow sense, be they first nations, nor local residents, nor industry,. Your constituency rather is all Canadians and, beyond that, all humanity. The world will be watching as Canada, one of the world's richest nations and bearing global responsibility for about 23% of the world's remaining wilderness, actively decides – yes or no – whether DSC will be allowed to continue to exist – a decision with enormous implications as we move deeper into the sixth global extinctionary episode.

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    [-] Victor

    The environmental assessment process needs:
    1) a commitment to scientific integrity
    2) mitigation measures which are ground truthed, and monitored
    3) cumulative effects must be applied spatially and across all industries and uses
    4) information must be transparent, public and permanent

    User avatar
    [-] Ian

    It seems to m e that Caribou recovery requires a landscape-level approach over many years to be effective. The long-term goal ought to aim for interconnected herds: one metapopulation.
    Piecemeal approaches to habitat protection will not work. The science shows that if caribou habitat continues to be destroyed, caribou will not recover.
    Meaningful recovery means strong, effective protection of 100 per cent of caribou habitat at high elevations as defined by the 2014 Federal Recovery Strategy.
    Don't be afraid of interconnected habitat across the stretch of the entire province. We humans can deal with this.

    Limiting/cancelling/postponing business tenures and recreational use in the critical high elevation habitats and corridors is needed. Too much traffic spooks the caribou. Give them a refuge now so that they might recover. Habitat, habitat, habitat.

    An aside, the comments procedure in this survey is troubling. Each individual person is asked to select their specific region and herd. But we need to connect these herd to others. Why are they seen as separate? Their interconnected ranges was key in allowing them to thrive before, and they need that again.

    User avatar
    [-] Tom

    Why is it that managers must consider impacts? Why isn't the shoe on the other foot? Most wildlife decision makers have little to no understanding of caribou and their requirements (I think by design as foresters and administrators are now the decision makers. their decsions consider jobs and political fallout and that bias only gets greater as the issue moves up the ladder.

    User avatar
    [-] Lorna

    Restoring and protecting connectivity of landscape and herds is essential – large contiguous areas of land to allow interconnection of herds and their ecosystems.

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    [-] Mark

    Land Use plan and target must be legislated. It must clear to the people of BC what the objectives for landuse are. Cumulative effects must be legislated and SDMs must adhere to legislated objectives not be allowed to negotiate deals with industry as was done with all the old growth logging that took place in Revelstoke. Negotiated percentages of old growth in caribou zones that the forest industry can log should not be allowed under provincial legislation.

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