7.1 First Nations Engagement and Collaboration



Our B.C. Government is committed to fully adopting and implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the Calls to Action  of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. This has important implications for the provincial Caribou Recovery Program.

British Columbia will work with First Nations and with other ministries to advance reconciliation through   the caribou program. We will involve First Nations communities across B.C. to ensure their interests are represented at all levels of decision-making, from early policy development to on-the-ground actions.

We will start with relationships already in place, such as Government-to-Government Agreements, and regional initiatives. Existing protocols will guide any partnerships and policies we expect will form as we expand projects on the ground, or as new situations arise.

We intend to work in close partnership with First Nations, and will follow these principles:

  • Support Aboriginal and Treaty rights and title
  • Develop collaborative methods for planning recovery
  • Create partnership opportunities in our recovery plans

13 responses to “7.1 First Nations Engagement and Collaboration

    User avatar
    [-] Anne

    I believe that the indigenous peoples hold almost all of the knowledge needed to save the caribou. Starting from this premise and listening to what is told by elders is key to saving the home of the people and thus the home of the animals as well. Including them in discussion is not enough. If this is truly “a made in BC” program to save the herds and provide habitat that is continuous and sustainable, begin with the reality that comes with being connected to the earth. This is knowledge we non-native people do not have. We have lost our way of connection and can only view from our collective perception.
    Indigenous peoples throughout Northern Europe have been managing herds for millennia. Again, there is a connection to the earth (home) and the animals (reindeer). The indigenous people here in B.C. also have knowledge of their home and the animals in it. We have only to listen and learn. No doubt the needed remedy will be hard to accomplish but if we can do it we will all start to turn to saving a home for all now and in the future.

    User avatar
    [-] Rachel

    As A 1st Nation Of Northern B.C. (Gitwangak), I Feel This Initiative Is Very Important, To Our 1st.Nations People & The Wilderness Of Canada. We Must Find Ways To Preserve Our Wild Animals For Generations To Come.

    User avatar
    [-] Onni

    I ask you to Walk the Talk for reconciliation and honouring UNDRIP. Approving the Site C dam is 180 degrees from that commitment. I am tired of empty political rhetoric that means "business as usual" destruction of First Nations land and territory. I ask my provincial government to not only "consult" for meaningless public relations spin but include First Nations' rights and expertise in caribou protection and recovery efforts, going beyond any consultation.

    User avatar
    [-] Heather

    We can do better than that. We can invite native people to advise us and actually listen and try to implement solutions. Perhaps helping elders to seek office could be part of a serious effort to improve the lives of all Canadians.

    User avatar
    [-] Bronwen

    Population recovery targets must meet the threshold of self-sustaining caribou populations across B.C.
    herds, including levels consistent to meet the needs of First Nations, Treaty and non-Treaty.

    User avatar
    [-] Bronwen

    Population recovery targets must meet the threshold of self-sustaining caribou populations across B.C.
    herds, including levels consistent to meet the needs of First Nations, Treaty and non-Treaty.
    There must be an expanded consideration of, as an act of reconciliation, the role of Indigenous people in
    planning for species conservation.
    Caribou recovery measures must be negotiated with First Nations in good faith.

    User avatar
    [-] Maryann

    Population recovery targets must meet the threshold of self-sustaining caribou populations across B.C. herds, including levels consistent to meet the needs of First Nations, Treaty and non-Treaty.

    There must be an expanded consideration of, as an act of reconciliation, the role of Indigenous people in planning for species conservation.
    Caribou recovery measures must be negotiated with First Nations in good faith.

    User avatar
    [-] Shannon

    Population recovery targets must meet the threshold of self-sustaining caribou populations across B.C.
    herds, including levels consistent to meet the needs of First Nations, Treaty and non-Treaty. There must be an expanded consideration of, as an act of reconciliation, the role of Indigenous people in planning for species conservation.
    Caribou recovery measures must be negotiated with First Nations in good faith.

    In Alaska and the Territories, caribou populations declined quickly. Even they are mystified as to why. Every theory or hunch is valid at this time. Experiment with what knowledge is acquired and move forward towards listening and population recovery.

    User avatar
    [-] Robyn

    Is this BC's turnaround for recognizing First Nations' wisdom, land, and treaty rights? Following hard on the heels of Site C – which seemed to overlook much of the above – this program nonetheless sets a lofty bar and I extend cautious hope that it will meet the goal of 'recovery' on all fronts!

    User avatar
    [-] Christina

    Beyond just developing collaborative methods, as an act of reconciliation we need to expand the role of Indigenous people in planning for species conservation. As Heather said, please ask Indigenous people to advise, and implement solutions they suggest.

    User avatar
    [-] Yvonne

    First Nations involvement in planning for caribou conservation is vital as a commitment to true reconciliation. Caribou population targets must be set to achieve a self-sustaining population that will meet the needs of First Nations.

    User avatar
    [-] Jennifer

    In supporting Treaty Rights, the recovery plan must have population targets that meet the needs of First Nations, Treaty and non-Treaty. It is not enough to simply have caribou on the landscape…there must be enough for First Nations people to harvest and rely upon.

    Collaboration with First Nations with regard to species recovery and the development of a recovery plan must go beyond simple consultation and into the realm of true co-management of the land and resources. This is of particular importance given the fact that much of the land in BC is unceded territory. The right to management of the land was never actually given over to the settler population and so a very important act of reconciliation is, at the very least, to co-manage…not simply consult.

    User avatar
    [-] Disa

    Population recovery targets must meet the threshold of self-sustaining caribou populations across B.C. herds, including levels consistent to meet the needs of First Nations, Treaty and non-Treaty.

    There is a need for an expanded consideration of the role of Indigenous people in planning for species conservation. Caribou recovery measures must be negotiated with First Nations in good faith.

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