7.5 Compliance and Enforcement



Updated goals for caribou recovery will require fresh ways to motivate people to comply with regulations. Generally, compliance is preferable to enforcement. Education and conversations with land users, stakeholders and the public encourage compliance. Enforcement will be required at times.

We will work on a natural resource sector-wide caribou compliance and enforcement strategy, building on existing roles and policies, with plans for enforcement and monitoring in specific areas. Recreational use, poaching, access control, forestry and mining will require much interaction for enforcement staff. We will develop an overall compliance and enforcement strategy that focuses on caribou and habitat.

8 responses to “7.5 Compliance and Enforcement

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    [-] Denise

    Good leadership is just as important as enforcement. Enforcement will need to start with the enforcing of plans and then work it's way to the ground.

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    [-] KERR

    Its time for the policing of industry in this province to be done by public independent agencies. It is ridiculous to continue with industry policing themselves given past and recent history, its money before environmental welfare all the time. Vancouver Sun May 28, 2018 "Caribou data kept secret…" by the oil and gas industry who continually broke the rules of exploration and severally affected the north east caribou herds. Christy is gone and its time for her industrial policies to be gone too!

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    [-] Calvin

    Don’t rely on just the COS to enforce this. There are other agencies such as Natural Resource Officers who should be made available. There are very large areas to cover, and too many days for one small group to cover it all.

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    [-] KX

    I agree with the others so far. Industry in Canada has (scientifically) proven over and over it cannot police itself. Enforcement by government inspectors can easily be paid for through royalties and taxes on already existing resources harvested areas (meaning new previously unused areas can still be left pristine when critical habitat or ecosystems are there, and any potential new dev area be thoroughly researched for what is there nature-wise first). These research, environmental review and enforcement should never involve proponents (they will pay government fees, and government will do the work of review and enforcement).

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    [-] Jennifer

    The enforcement strategy must involve enforcement with MEANINGFUL fines and consequences. Too often fines associated with damage to the environment (habitat, wildlife etc.) are not large enough to be meaningful for the person or business that is fined and therefore the infractions are more likely to occur again.

    To avoid this, fines should be calculated as a proportion of the individual's or business's income, NOT as a flat rate fine. This proportional fine is much better, as it penalizes all people and businesses fairly. Flat rate fines unduly burden low-income earners and make it much easier for high income individuals or businesses to continually break the rules and laws, simply because they can afford to do so; for them the fine is far less than the benefit they obtained by their activities that broke the law.

    This type of fine system has already been successfully used for decades in Finland. https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2015/mar/04/finland-speeding-progressive-punishment-motorist-fine

    The higher fines would help with compliance, and the revenue from the fines could then be used to fund adequate numbers of enforcement personnel and hours.

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    [-] Victor

    There should be increased oversight, enforcement and monitoring of all industries provincially, including those in Carobou recovery zones. Oversight should be conducted through a Natural Resources Practices Board to evaluate practices and serve as an independent watchdog for natural resource management in BC

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    [-] Victor

    There should be legislated commitments around staffing and budgeting through the Conservation Service. All fines resulting from infractions in Caribou recovery zones should go back to landscape level management in the area where the violation occurred

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    [-] Mark

    There needs to be a legislated provincial oversight body with a mandate to audit wildlife objectives. Simple solution is to expand the mandate of the FPB so it has a scope that covers wildlife and practices in the mining,, oil and gas and power/transportation industries.

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