Discussion 3 – Clean Energy Vehicles – Commercial Vehicles (Clean Transportation)



Clean Energy Vehicles – Commercial Vehicles

A significant portion of provincial transportation related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions comes from the commercial transportation sector, with heavy-duty vehicles accounting for 15% of GHG emissions.

The government is working with industry to save time, fuel, money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Proposed actions could build on current incentive programs such as Weigh2GoBC, the Specialty-Use Vehicle Incentive Program, and continue working with utilities to expand their incentives to help companies experience the benefits of Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) as a fuel for their fleet, vessel, or power generation applications.

The Specialty Use Vehicle Incentive Program, which supports the purchase of clean heavy-duty vehicles, buses, transport trucks, motorcycles and heavy equipment, could be expanded to support electric charging and hydrogen fuelling infrastructure at ports, service yards and truck stops.

Investments in clean technologies would continue including more development in B.C.-based battery and fuel cell technologies, which could help our trucking and marine sectors reduce their emissions.

Other jurisdictions are making progress with emissions reductions for commercial heavy-duty vehicles.

  • In June 2018, Canada revised regulations for heavy-duty vehicles, engines, and trailers. The regulations introduce stronger standards for vehicles and engines in model year 2021, and increase in stringency up to model year 2027 to give manufacturers and owners time to adapt. The updated regulations also introduce standards designed to make pulling trailers easier, thus improving a truck’s overall fuel efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions

More zero emission options are currently being implemented or are under development. For example:

  • B.C. based Loop Energy’s is developing and implementing its hydrogen fuel cell range extender system for heavy-duty truck applications; combined with an electric battery system, it helps provide extended range for zero emission operations.
  • Norwegian ferry operator Fjord1 is implementing all-electric ferries powered by B.C.-based Corvus Energy’s lithium ion battery-based energy storage systems. For longer range ferries, ferry operators are working on a hybrid ferry design consisting of 50% hydrogen mixed with a plug-in battery system.
  • Recently, the California Air Resources Board announced a number of projects to accelerate a transition to zero emission off-road equipment, such as hydrogen fuel-cell powered cargo-handling equipment, battery electric high lift capacity forklifts, and fuel cell and battery-electric yard trucks at ports.
  • BC Transit and Translink are testing battery electric buses, and B.C.-based Ballard is supplying hydrogen fuel cell electric buses around the world. Quebec-based Lion Electric Co offers an all-electric school bus, manufactured in North America.

Questions:

  • What opportunities are there to reduce emissions by making commercial transportation cleaner and more efficient?
  • What challenges need to be considered when working to support cleaner commercial transportation systems?

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73 responses to “Discussion 3 – Clean Energy Vehicles – Commercial Vehicles (Clean Transportation)

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    [-] Arthur

    The BC ambulance service (BCEHS) fleet is an ideal target for electrification. BC ambulances put tens of millions of kilometers on the road every year, costing tax payers millions of dollars in fuel and putting thousands of tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere. While pure electric vehicles may still pose range concerns, plug-in hybrid and extended range electric vehicle technology has come far enough that it is entirely workable in an ambulance context, and would allow ambulances in most situations to drive the majority of their kilometers on electricity, while still having gas as a reliable back up. (It would even increase their operational resiliency in a disaster situation, such as an earthquake, where access to gas and/or electricity might become disrupted.)

    The driving circumstances are nearly ideal, too. Most ambulances stay within a somewhat limited geographic area, and they already need to be plugged in during down-time at stations to maintain their electrical systems and equipment. It wouldn’t be too difficult to replace that current 120 volt infrastructure with level 3 chargers, and use the down-time to charge vehicle batteries in-between calls. Additionally, crews regularly need a good 20 minutes at hospitals to hand over care of their patients, complete documentation and clean equipment, and that’s before any number of common additional delays. Installing fast chargers at hospital ambulance bays as well would give electric capable ambulances another reliable opportunity to replenish charge.

    The problem is that the ambulance service currently needs at least 80 new ambulances a year to maintain the fleet, but only has the available funds for about 60-70. That means older vehicles need to be retained beyond their intended service life, with the increased maintenance burden and added cost that comes along with that. Throw on further stresses like the opioid epidemic, and the ambulance service is currently in a place where it’s too preoccupied with barely keeping its head above water to have much leeway for things like undertaking an electric fleet transition.

    A mandate and bit of extra financial help from the government could go a long way towards overcoming the initial costs and hurdles of making that transition; and once done, the millions no longer being spent on fuel (or extra maintenance, etc.) could instead be put towards shoring up the service’s ability to cope with the current resource demands upon it, helping to ensure that it’s properly able to provide all of us with good, timely care when we need it most. It would be hitting two birds with one stone: a stronger emergency service for less CO2 emissions.

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    [-] Barry

    Daily train passenger service from the lower mainland to Prince George or even Prince Rupert. Would help reduce emissions and road traffic; especially if locomotives were electric., using maybe Ballard fuel cells.

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    [-] Cathy

    Ban diesel fuel.
    Copy Norway and California.
    Require school buses and public transit buses as well as ferries to be electric or hydrogen fuel cell electric buses (what a shame the hydrogen fuel cell buses have been removed from Whistler).

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    [-] Rebecca

    – In July, BC Ferries issued a request for proposals for 5 new C-class vessels. The older vessels these will be replacing went into service around 40 years ago; the new vessels will presumably have a similar life span. This means that they will be potentially in service into the 2060s. British Columbia has a goal of reducing emissions 80% by 2050. Therefore, by the end of the new ferries’ lifespans, by the government’s own goals, we will need to be producing dramatically less CO2, potentially none at all. This means that, in order to not soon be rendered obsolete or incompatible with government goals, the 5 new BC ferries vessels must be electric. I am not sure if the technology to make this happen exists, but what if the BC government issued a request specifically for electric ferries to be build in British Columbia? Not only would this prevent a contradiction between government policy, it could create a new industry in our province for electric passenger ships. These will increasingly be in demand worldwide, as we work to mitigate the climate crisis.

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    [-] Craig

    Given BCs hydro-electric infrastructure I would like to see a focus on E and hybrid options for large vehicles and to do that we will need subsidies for transitioning for the transportation industry. We will also need a strong quick charge system along transportation routes that can be used for both large and small vehicles.

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    [-] Paul

    As mentioned by others, we should begin planning now to electrify BC ferries. This is being done by Washington State, and there is no reason BC ferries couldn’t also do it. We should also start looking at plans to both increase and electrify BC’s rail freight capacity.

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    [-] Michael

    I place a high value on goods movement over private vehicle use. I would consider creating dedicated goods movement corridors and lanes.

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    [-] ron

    The major challenge of “change in this industry is “cross border” effects. Whether the border is between BC and Alberta or BC and Washington State or Idaho long haul trucking and rail carriers need common systems. For this reason BC should spend its effort working with the other provinces and the federal government to establish long term plans that will work. It is easy to see electric trains for example as they are already hybrid diesel electrics in many cases. But it is of little use if the engine needs to be changed whenever the train crosses a border.
    For local fleet operators, any of the new technologies are ideal starting points for market penetration. Since they tend to be centrally maintained and managed, having central fueling / recharge facilities can make a lot of sense. Providing them with tax incentives either through accelerated depreciation, removal of road taxes, and removal of PST etc. will many cases overcome the initial capital cost barrier and provide cost incentives to their operations. Bus and government operations are sort of a no- brainer. If you can’t lead then don’t try to change things. This should not be an election issue nor in the great scheme of things a budget issue.

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    [-] David

    Build efficient, fast, light rail along HWY1 from North Vancouver to the Fraser Valley.

    Expand subway/skytrain network in metro-Vancouver. Dedicate roads for bikes and pedestrians only.

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    [-] Sheila

    Capture airlines and marine shipping in regulations, or pressure feds to.

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    [-] Thomas

    I think we need to take a serious look at biomass-based dimethyl ether (DME) which can be used in slightly modified diesel engines while dramatically reducing pollution. There is a demonstration project in Alberta now.

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    [-] Laurie

    Hydrogen (H2) is created from fossil fuels (reforming fracked LNG mainly) and thus are not sustainable. Even when created from renewable electricity through electrolysis, H2 is less than 40% as efficient as battery electric vehicles (BEV). That’s a big difference!

    It costs a minimum of $2 million to provide a hydrogen refueling station. An electric fast charger costs less than a tenth of that. What a huge difference! Please don’t use taxpayers money for a small number of hydrogen refuelling stations.

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    [-] Laurie

    Here is a recent speech by Tony Seba, Stanford University energy expert, who predicts EVs will take over the market soon, and between this and autonomous vehicles, the world will be very different (in good ways unless you own an oil company). You might want to watch the video. BC would be wise to follow Tony’s advice, promote electric cars in many ways, and not promote vehicles with an internal combustion engine (or ships with an internal combustion engine using diesel, bunker fuel or LNG).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hoB7HN4B0k

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    [-] Laurie

    Let’s not go for LNG powered marine vessels.

    LNG is, in the big picture, not a clean source of power, nor has it a lower carbon footprint.

    1. In BC, 75% or more of our natural gas comes from fracking. Soon all of our natural gas will be fracked. Fracking permanently contaminates large amounts of fresh water with industry-secret toxins, and this fracked waste water is poorly dealt with. Fracked wells don’t yield natural gas for very long compared to conventional wells, so wilderness gets cut up by more and more fracking pads and roads to them.

    2. LNG is not a lower greenhouse gas “bridge fuel”. Why? Because of leaks of natural gas (methane), very powerful greenhouse gas. Leakage with fracking is significantly higher than the industry admits to. There is also leakage from abandoned gas wells, compressor stations, pipes, flaring/venting, LNG plants, and old LNG tankers. President Obama promoted fracking for natural gas, and later when science discovered all this leaking, he was very concerned about what he had done/the fracking industry that was created.

    3. Natural gas does produce about half the carbon dioxide that coal produces. However when you take all the above leaks into account, Richard Hughes (highly respected Canadian geophysicist) says BC LNG is 27% worse re greenhouse gasses than the best coal burning technology China can build.

    4. BC LNG’ s substantial subsidies: The hopeful BC LNG industry has received significant long term corporate, royalty, and sales tax concessions from the BC government, in addition to subsidized power rates (which you and I will pay the difference on), exemption from carbon taxes, postponed PST on construction materials, and an accelerated depreciation rate. Outstanding tax credits for the gas industry are now over $3 billion. The industry will return no money to public coffers for at least 10 years. Let’s not subsidize them even more.

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    [-] Laurie

    Electric ferries are a great idea. An electrified Port is also a wonderful idea.

    I am not sure why you would promote renewable natural gas, if you are trying to reduce greenhouse gasses. Natural gas (methane) is a very potent greenhouse gas, much worse than carbon dioxide. It’s so easy to have leaks in any system dealing with natural gas. Instead, let’s go for ZEVs.

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    [-] peter

    Provide incentives for electric and renewable natural gas fleet conversions. Fleet conversions often require large capital investments for new service bay technologies; include these in the incentive programs.

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    [-] Laurie

    With any natural gas system, there will probably be leaks that quickly eliminate any carbon advantage. Natural gas is a very powerful greenhouse gas.

    LNG is actually not advantageous re carbon in comparison to coal because of leaks from: fracking, piping, flaring/venting, old LNG tankers that vent methane for safety, old natural gas wells, etc.

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    [-] Dr.

    Bicycles are the ultimate zero-emission vehicle, and they can be used as commercial vehicles in an urban setting – check our how its done in the rest of the world!

    Please invest more in bike networks and provide financial incentives including rebates and low cost loans for bicycles, electric bikes and cargo bikes as well as eliminating the PST on electric bikes.

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    [-] Mohammad

    A company like Plugz.io can enhance already existing infrastructures to make EV charging accessible for the fleets anywhere anytime with a fraction of the cost. I suggest supporting local initiatives to make a global statement so other can follow our lead.

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    [-] Lee

    Helping the federal government keep its regulatory commitments on HDVs is probably the most important thing BC can do for this sector. Continuing rapid emissions growth in the HDV sector will make it difficult for BC to move towards its 2030 target.

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    [-] Lisa

    BAN DIESEL BUSES, TRUCKS, TRANSPORT AND EVENTUALLY FERRIES, TUGS, FREIGHTERS AND YACHTS.

    WORLD HEALTH AND THE CANCER ORG. , KNOW THAT DIESEL IS CARCINOGENIC. CAUSES LUNG CANCER. DIESEL IS A KILLER. NOT JUST A CAUSE OF CLIMATE CHANGE. DIESEL GOES DIRECTLY IN TO OUR LUNGS, OUR CHILDRENS LUNGS….

    IT IS TIME TO SAY “NO” TO DIESEL. OTHER CITIES ARE DOING THIS.

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    [-] Laura

    One additional example of ZEV technologies targeting commercial vehicles is Hydra Energy Corporation. Hydra has introduced and commercially tested an extension of Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine (HICE) technology to aftermarket Class 8 heavy-duty diesel trucks. These trucks are being retrofitted with a dual fuel system intended to displace a minimum of 40% of diesel fuel, reducing emissions while eliminating range anxiety, preserving vehicle performance, load capacity, and fuel efficiency.

    HICE technology is an alternative to fuel cell technology more suitable to retrofit aftermarket vehicles, including heavy-duty internal combustion engine trucks.

    Retrofitting post-sale heavy duty vehicles offers a significant opportunity to reduce carbon emissions that is not currently being fully supported in the proposed regulatory environment. Federal and provincial governments could create a more balanced competitive environment that encourages technology inclusiveness and the adoption of clean technologies in these post-sale vehicles, plus capitalization on existing infrastructure.

    By enabling a diverse and inclusive technology portfolio, government can motivate investment in niche solutions that help meet emissions reductions targets faster.

    Two specific technology-based solutions that can be included in the pathway to clean commercial transportation are: commercial vehicle retrofitting and hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) technology. Each of these technology solutions can be included within BC’s regulatory framework for allowances, tax exemptions, incentives, and other programs on the same terms as currently exist for other technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells, and electric batteries.

    While new fuel cell and battery technologies can be more easily applied to new vehicles, there are over one billion internal combustion engine vehicles on the road today and over 100 million new vehicles being sold annually, most of which are still designed to run on fossil fuels. Retrofitting such vehicles has an enormous potential as part of the transition to clean transportation. This solution also eliminates the trade-offs between price, weight, range and recharge time that breakthroughs in electric batteries and fuel cells still face.

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    [-] Thomas

    What are the economics of conversion like and can the hydrogen refuelling infrastructure be made affordable? I know CNG and LNG stations are expensive and I am thinking that hydrogen would have similar, if not more serious challenges due to the higher pressures and lower cyrogenic liquid temperatures. Curious to hear about how that would work.

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    [-] Louise

    No expansion in fossil fuel production, infrastructure or transport is morally responsible now or in future. No plans for the expansion of natural gas products — even those with musleading names like Renewable Natural Gas should be considered.

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    [-] Thomas

    Renewable Natural Gas is made from old landfill waste, source separated organics and manure. The later two are definitely renewable and reduce the methane emissions that would occur otherwise. Renewable Natural Gas is a form of biogas which has been upgraded (mainly the CO2 removed) so it can be injected into the natural gas grid or used in a natural gas vehicle. Renewable natural gas is being widely considered as a way to integrate wind power in Germany as the pipeline infrastructure can act like a giant battery. It is far cheaper too store and move energy as a methane gas than as an electron or in a battery.

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    [-] Mary

    Please aggressively expand all kinds of ride sharing, including green transit. ZCV car sharing options.

    Subsidize more heavily electrical options for buses, trucks, ships, and airplanes.

    It is a carbon crisis! We must face it realistically and follow the science which says get off carbon fuels ASAP to face climate breakdown and catastrophe.

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    [-] Sara

    Restrict through regulation the operation of large, polluting vehicles in urban centres. Highway sized busses and trucks have no business operating in our cities. Instead restrictions should be put in place and incentives offered to operate cleaner electric vehicles, including electric cargo bikes, for deliveries and recreation, etc.

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    [-] Erin

    Introduce load-sharing as a provincial requirement and a network for communication. How many trucks return empty when hauling goods? Could we reduce our transportation costs and emissions at the same time?

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    [-] Tim

    BC Ferries needs to adopt all electric power immediately. Ontario has several electric vessels on order and Washington State is converting its fleet now.
    Infrastructure capacity for moving freight should only be increased with rail systems. Rail is more energy efficient and can be electrified by either battery or overhead power lines.
    The biggest challenge will be reducing the demand for consumer goods we don’t need. Everybody wants too much stuff!

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    [-] brian

    easy fix is to bring back propane and natural gas as they burn 50xs cleaner than diesel.

    electric is going to take decades to bring about, but in the short term natural gas and propane could make a huge difference in air quality bc anyone who knows anything about engines and fuels knows propane and natural gas has no particulate emmsions. it is the only fuel that can be burnt inside a warehouse bc it is so clean.

    also make it so people can fuel their own cars after taking the short course on do’s and don’t of fueling. bc as it is right no gas stations have to certify the people pumping propane which is a big hassle.

    I currently have a propane truck I can’t drive bc I don’t know where I can fuel up if I travel anywhere.

    ban the production of diesel cars n trucks bc they are the worse polluters on the market aaaannnndddd the increase demand on diesel supplies only drives up the cost of diesel which in turn drives up the cost of everything delivered….duh!?

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    [-] Thomas

    Propane can reduce Co2 emissions by 30-40 with advanced technology. However, DME made from wood and pulpmill waste can reduce emissions to an even lower ratew while keeping the compression ignition cycle. However, there are some interesting bio-propane technologies coming along.

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    [-] Eve

    We already have battery electric buses, all new buses in bc should be electric.
    Ferries need to be electric.
    Next is the electric semi for road transport, the tech is here already.
    Challenge is getting the old semis off the road and switching to electric semi and expanding the electric charger network for them to remote areas. Battery supported solar panel charging station network throughout the trucking route across the province.

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    [-] Donald

    Electric rail, for freight and passengers.
    Electric assist cargo-bikes should be able to handle most freight for that last mile from train to destination.
    Small electric cargo vans, only when absolutely necessary, and only during off-peak hours.

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    [-] Laurie

    The public have been ready for the change over to EVs for too long now. Put your incentive programs where they are wanted. Set up your charging networks. Forget about Natural gas fuels. GO ELECTRIC and do it now!

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    [-] Lloyd

    What opportunities are there to reduce emissions by making commercial transportation cleaner and more efficient?

    In my view, Canada and in every province, we have been slow to restore the rail system that Sir John A Macdonald built from coast to coast! While trucking can be improved with electric operation, but that does not reduce the wear & tear on road infrastructure; therefore, we must restore rail as well as increase the new rail services to areas that were not previously inhabited or commercially important.

    Train services for passenger and for freight are needed to counter road congestion and costs even if electrified. And green energy options now permit rail operations every where with far less hampered weather conditions and around the clock than manned systems on roads.

    There are numerous benefits of making this transformation rapidly in locations such as Vancouver Island where government neglect ended rail services eight years ago. I urge that similar locations in BC be funded to overcome rapidly growing limitations of roads in growing populations.

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    [-] Ann

    I believe we also need to look for ways to get commercial vehicles off the road and onto mass transit – hub and spoke distribution, with final distribution happening close to the location. This would require a major revamp of our zoning and urban/periurban planning.

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    [-] Jae

    Clean Energy BC firmly believes that our province can lead the way to a low-carbon economy through extensive electrification. Extensive electrification would reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, create significant inward investment and jobs. We will shortly be releasing our white paper entitled: Power Forward; Assessing the Economic and Environmental Benefits of Extensive Electrification in British Columbia, it focuses on exploring how electrification offers BC an opportunity to meet our climate targets and strengthen the economy. Listed below are some excerpts from the white paper.
    Transportation (Based upon research by UVic in June 2018)

    • It is great that Corvus is mentioned in the briefing for discussion 3. They are a globally leading example of electrifying the marine sector. In addition they also work to electrify port side equipment as well. We must remember that although they are a BC business, they recently were purchased by the Norwegian government. This is linked to the fact that Norway is the world leader in implementing electric ferry transformation. They walk the walk. If BC had taken up this lead, we might very well have kept the ownership of this company in Canada.

    • Vancouver has its own electric bus manufacture as well. They are Green power Bus http://www.greenpowerbus.com/ yet again another example of a globally leading company with the broadest range of EV buses on the market.

    • Electrification of the container ships as they sit in harbors is another important area to look at. Ships burn high sulfur marine fuel to run the ancillary services while anchored. We could become a leading example of plugging in while in BC ports and harbors. We could also require aircraft to do the same and turn off their auxiliary power units while on the gate.

    • Norway is looking at requiring short hall flights to also be electric by 2030.

    • Financial incentives and mandates are needed to encourage the transition to electric vehicles. In addition, a competitive market will enable the growth of EV charging infrastructure.

    • UVic’s research shows that electric medium-duty trucks could reduce GHG emissions by 5.51 Mt CO2e by 2040. Implementing an EV truck and bus mandate would showcase that BC is an early-adopter of cleantech. https://www.cleanenergybc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Transport-Electrification-Metrics.pdf

    An excerpt from our white paper shows that in the 2040 Hypothetical Scenario could deliver:

    Passenger cars:
    Additional Electricity Required (GWh) 4,297
    GHG reductions (Mt CO2e) 1.51
    Increase in electricity production in BC to meet this demand 6.5%

    Trucks (light, medium and Large):
    Additional Electricity Required (GWh) 21,629
    GHG reductions (Mt CO2e) 9.6
    Increase in electricity production in BC to meet this demand 32.7%

    Bus:
    Additional Electricity Required (GWh) 200
    GHG reductions (Mt CO2e) 0.1
    Increase in electricity production in BC to meet this demand 0.3%

    Aggregate total of passenger cars, trucks and buses:
    Additional Electricity Required (GWh) 26,126
    GHG reductions (Mt CO2e) 11.2
    Increase in electricity production in BC to meet this demand 39.5%

    BC can learn from Quebec, California, Norway, the UK, France and China from their best practices in rolling out EV mandates. It has been shown that mandates should be focused on manufacturers instead of dealers. This enables individual dealers to take leadership rolls and those that are less inclined to take more time to build expertise and market awareness.

    Jae Mather
    Executive Director
    Clean Energy BC

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    [-] Curtis

    I think there is a big opportunity to reduce emissions in the commercial marine sector by encouraging the adoption of ZEVs and conversion of existing vessels to ZEVs for small, short-haul applications, such as harbour passenger ferries and water taxis. Marine vehicles tend to be much worse pulluters than road vehicles, because they use more fuel, and there is less monitoring of emissions from marine engines. I think a high visibility pilot study of conversion to marine ZEV and subsequent reduced operating costs, as well as a quieter, exhaust-free passenger experience, might raise public awareness of what is possible, and persuade adoption by operators.

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    [-] willi

    Forget the rebate – just cancel the social services taxes on e-vehicles
    Who will pay the road taxes when gasoline consumption drops ????

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    [-] Curtis

    I think that’s a great problem for the government to solve. If road taxes are to be funded by users, then tax collection needs to migrate to where those users ‘fuel’ their vehicles, or to some other means of collection. There must be some way for today’s smart vehicles to announce their presence on a particular road for taxation purposes. Maybe that’s an option. Also, if implementation of a taxation scheme lags ZEV growth, that’s seen as an incentive for ZEVs.

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    [-] Michael

    It costs a minimum of $2 million to provide a hydrogen refueling station. A n electric fast charger costs less than a tenth of that. Hydrogen has interesting possibilities for aviation and shipping but is too expensive for vehicles.

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    [-] Michael

    Electric buses are performing well in various places around the world including Victoria BC! Time to switch. Purchase of ICE buses should be banned about two years after the introduction of the new rules (to allow time for existing purchase processes to complete) and after that all new buses should be electric. The reduction in noise on our city streets will be worth it alone.

    Tesla has proven that electric big rigs are possible and highly effective. Let us start a program of incentives for the purchase of electric trucks leading to a ban on ICE trucks once they are available in sufficient numbers.

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    [-] John

    Too little, and too slowly. I have heard nothing in the news other than BC Ferries saying no to battery operated ferries – poor optics on that one! Start with what you can control and make all buses catenary wire overhead or electric. I know diesel is efficient for mass transit but it has terrible optics literally with clouds of smoke from the newest of buses and creates micro-particulate pollution too.
    The opportunity is huge here for the transportation industry to stop fighting everything on the basis of lost profits and jobs and get on with it.

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    [-] Lois

    Tesla has created a superior, all-electric freight vehicle. It is now doable. The time for debate is over. New vehicles will need govt support as they are pricey, however, the future is even more dicey if we don’t get moving.

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    [-] jim

    BC is notorious in saying they regulate the emissions of diesel trucks but BC does not enforce the regulations. Climate change is an emergency. BC must enforce existing regulations and significantly raise the cost of truck use (road use tax). This will incentive truck users to dramatically improve the efficiency of truck use, in proportion to the severity of the tax. More tax and policing of cheaters will result in increased efficiency of truck use.

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    [-] Mark

    Transition public transit fleets to fully electric as existing diesel buses are retired.

    Reintroduce electric passenger rail on Vancouver Island and throughout the BC interior (and subsidize to keep prices low) as a viable clean alternative to driving.

    Electrify freight rail lines throughout the province.

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    [-] Glenn

    Hydrogen (H2) is created from fossil fuels (reforming fracked LNG mainly) and thus are not sustainable. Even when created from renewable electricity through electrolysis, H2 is less than 40% as efficient as battery electric vehicles (BEV).
    H2 is just another fossil industry boondoggle.

    Taking our transport sector into full electrification makes our industries cleaner, financially leaner (more competitive), and makes BC less vulnerable to external energy threats, thus more autonomous.

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    [-] Dick

    First of all, issue transit passes to every BC resident. This will encourage the use and transit authorities will have to respond with more alternatives. A simple addition to the property tax or purchase tax would pay for this.

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    [-] Louise

    All public transportation, including municipal buses, school buses (including private school buses) and private tour bus/coaches around the City of Vancouver eg Capilano Suspension Bridge / Whistler need to be switched to electric / hybrid asap. The amount of black exhaust fumes emitted from these buses is extraordinary and is something we notice on a daily basis. Especially when other countries have already transitioned eg UK. It is something noticed and commented on negatively by visitors to BC. The province lags behind by using diesel powered buses but can quickly
    catch up if it prioritizes this. It should not be hesitating. These surveys are not required. Just look at other developed nations especially those in Europe. We are far far behind!! Thank you and looking forward to cleaner vehicles very soon.

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    [-] Jesse

    Enforce idling restrictions on transport vehicles and provide framework for electric cargo handlers, cargo loaders and other support equipment. Also, reserving transporter lanes with mandated optimal speed limit for each road segment could help improve applied efficiency.

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    [-] Mario

    BC Ferries should purchase hybrid ferries as well

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    [-] Mario

    Install hydrogen fuelling stations at bus and truck depots and start buying hydrogen busses and trucks.

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    [-] Glenn

    Hydrogen (H2) is created from fossil fuels (reforming fracked LNG mainly) and thus are not sustainable. Even when created from renewable electricity through electrolysis, H2 is less than 40% as efficient as battery electric vehicles (BEV).
    H2 is just another fossil industry boondoggle

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    [-] Mike

    Transition BC’s fleet of municipal busses to electric models, immediately. With half the fleet up for replacement in the next 5 years, this is the perfect opportunity.

    And stop the pilots and studies. There isn’t a need to confirm that existing eBusses can meet the demands of many bus routes, especially flatter ones. Implement the infrastructure this year and ban future diesel bus purchases.

    Major cities in China have converted whole fleets to eBusses. We can too.

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    [-] Michael

    How about a Government regulation that all new taxi/ride hailing vehicles must be electric?

    A large bank of BC Hydro fast charging stations can be installed at the Vancouver Airport for the taxi/ride hailing vehicles.

    As an incentive and to compensate for vehicle charging downtime, electric taxi/ride hailing vehicles could have a priority lane to pick up passengers at the Vancouver Airport terminals.

    Other BC Hydro fast charging stations can be installed throughout the Lower Mainland at taxi stands.

    For comparison, some cities elsewhere (i.e. London (England), New York City etc.) regulate which vehicles or vehicle types are acceptable for use as taxis.

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    [-] Richard

    This is a good idea. Would encourage people to buy electric vehicles, get the most use and benefit out of electric vehicles and reduce the cost for ride hailing drivers increasing the amount of money that they make (which is an issue).

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    [-] Sharon

    Fast rail systems for transporting people and goods like they use in Europe. No point in reinventing the wheel, when success exists in other countries. Making good use of our solar advantage in many BC cities for battery charging buses and trains would be worthwhile investigating. BC Hydro seems to have a surplus of energy, even without Site C, so there should be no excuses. Storage capacity for solar would have to be investigated as well, so trains and buses can run into the evening.

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    [-] John

    I agree with many of the comments already made here.
    An electrified train should be considered on the abandoned Vancouver Island corridor.

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    [-] Seth

    I would like to see emissions reduced by making most transportation unnecessary, through localization incentives.

    Supplying necessities and more as locally as possible has many benefits aside from reducing emissions–much-needed resilience, a sense of community and belonging When have we ever been so dislocated from place, home and community as now? This is part of why many people cannot bring themselves to care about the so-called ‘environment’–that distant abstraction. It’s not the same as protecting your home.

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    [-] Jeannie

    Let’s get the buses on board with hybrid of electric models! That makes so much sense…moving large groups of people cleanly and quietly! Buses are great, but noisy. No emissions, no noise!

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    [-] Glenn

    For zero emissions from both the bus and it’s “fuel” supply only battery electric vehicles (BEV) meet the bill.

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    [-] Edward

    I am confused. Isn’t the third part of the transportation intentions paper supposed to be about systems. ie fewer trips. Shorter trips. Complete communities landuse planning.

    I hereby start a thread regarding land use, TDM, and multimodalism.

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    [-] Richard

    It is confusing. They should be focusing on mode choice first, then on electric vehicles. They say they will focus on mode choice later.

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    [-] Chris

    I’d like to see incentives for BC companies to buy all electric semi trucks like the Tesla Semi or the Mercedes eTruck.

    Like Norway, we should be electrifying our ferries. The technology exists and it works for many routes

    As for hydrogen, I understand BC wants to support local businesses, but hydrogen fuel is not a viable technology and we should stop wasting taxpayer dollars supporting it.

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    [-] Glenn

    Agree wholeheartedly for both efficiency and environmental reasons.

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    [-] Gord

    Please pursue regional Hydrail passenger rail between cities for seniors, youth, visitors that either choose or are unable to drive. Rail is a lower cost, lower carbon solution to flying, and building more highways, not to mention way safer! Passenger/E-rail has been in EU for decades using third rail or overhead pantograph, but is costly. UBC is researching using made in BC technology – Hydrogen Fuel Cell/battery hybrid gateway technology for buses and regional passenger rail (and ultimately freight rail) as a way to transition all of NA away from stinking, noisy, vibrating deisel fuels. Therefore, please ensure all future provincial transportation planning in BC includes consideration for regional passenger rail, in BOTH urban and rural areas – across all of BC. It works, and is cheaper, cleaner, greener, quieter, safer – go visit EU if you want proof – all their rural communities as connected by e-rail!

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    [-] Glenn

    Hydrogen (H2) is created from fossil fuels (reforming fracked LNG mainly) and thus are not sustainable. Even when created from renewable electricity through electrolysis, H2 is less than 40% as efficient as battery electric vehicles (BEV).
    H2 is just another fossil industry boondoggle.

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    [-] Neil

    With the rapid advancement in battery technology, I am highly skeptical of the relative benefit of fuel cells (especially given that most hydrogen is derived from natural gas, and is not carbon free). I fear a missed opportunity in dumping money into technology that is perpetually 10 years away, when battery tech is now, and continually marching forward.

    By all means, though, let us electrify our ferry fleet.

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    [-] Chris

    Agreed. We need to stop wasting taxpayer dollars. Hydrogen had 20 years to become viable. It’s been a huge money sink the entire time and the tech is still no where close to viable. Meanwhile, battery tech is making huge progress and is getting cheaper by the day.

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    [-] John

    Encouraging BC based companies in developing ZEV solutions for the commercial vehicles is an important global opportunity, and the opportunity is now.

    The most critical thing that makes these new businesses and initiatives work is to make sure that those businesses have ready markets to sell them in, starting in their home market – BC.

    Make sure mandates and incentives for these vehicles are in place.

    BC Ferries should be considering electric ferries for short run routes – and even conversions of existing ships. Build in BC, using BC company products and talent! Have the batteries roll-on in battery trucks, and roll-off/switch at the other end for quick turnaround and off-board recharging.

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    [-] Glenn

    Well said!

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    [-] Jared

    I think there’s great emissions reduction possibilities in this sector. Developing high speed electric rail systems similar to what’s in use in some European countries would be a great step forward

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    [-] Michael

    I wholeheartedly support this.

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