Discussion 3: What can you and others do to prepare for impacts from climate change?



The Province is doing critical work through CleanBC to reduce our emissions and take action on climate change. But greenhouse gas emissions already in the atmosphere will continue to cause changes over the coming decades. Preparing for climate change is about understanding these changes and developing appropriate measures to respond and be prepared. It’s what we call being “climate-ready”.

Dirk Nyland, Ministry of Transportation Chief Engineer, Retired

 

While BC will have warmer temperatures in all regions, each region will face different climate impacts. For example, southern Vancouver Island will experience considerably less rain in the summer, while north-east regions of the province will see more precipitation across all seasons.
 
To explore specific climate impacts for your region, check out the Plan2Adapt tool: www.pacificclimate.org/analysis-tools/plan2adapt
 
Generally, climate changes likely to occur in B.C. include:

  • Warmer temperatures in all seasons
  • More intense and more common heavy rain events
  • Increased drought and water shortages
  • Larger and more frequent wildfires
  • Changes in growing seasons for crops and gardens
  • Changes in streamflow patterns and lake levels
  • Stronger storm surges
  • Rising sea levels
  • Changing forest conditions
  • Changes in plant and animal distributions
  • Smaller snowpack and loss of glaciers
  • Lowering the pH of the Ocean (Ocean Acidification)

 

Question 3: What parts of your life do you feel will be affected by future climate change? What are you doing or what could you do to prepare for these changes? What could others (e.g. government, businesses) do to prepare?

Share photos of the changes you are seeing on social media and tag #ClimateReadyBC and #MyClimateStoryBC

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48 responses to “Discussion 3: What can you and others do to prepare for impacts from climate change?

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    [-] Lily

    Interesting enough the climate variability has affected the hydrological pattern in the local watershed the most, which is a fundamental factor of the changes in ecosystems. For government, industry and communities to respond to climate change proactively, we’ll need more studies to identify climate change impacts to the hydrological cycle and assess risks to watersheds and ecosystems, and develop and implement strategies and action plans to address climate resilience in water supply and water infrastructure systems through integrated watershed management and sustainable land development.

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    [-] harshan

    We can do a lot:
    • Know your risks and have a plan to manage them, both personally and professionally
    • Learn about lower carbon and resilient strategies, approaches and solutions
    • Learn about community engagement and working in diverse teams that includes planners, biologists, landscape architects, indigenous experts, and members of the public
    • Strive to achieve consensus on a balance point that includes a reasonable consideration of climate
    • Make your voice heard and help shape public policy

    Be in the know about:
    • Climate data and trends (it is possible to use climate data to drive design decisions)
    • International and local legislation, codes and standards (model I-codes, ISO Standards, local by-laws and policies from emergency declarations)
    • Funding and Incentive Programs (Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Funding, Green Municipal Fund etc., Better Buildings BC)
    • Risk assessment (ISO 31000, ISO 14090, PIEVC etc.) and carbon accounting (ISO14064 series) tools/methodologies
    • Cost benefit analysis: NPVs, ROI, discount rates, value engineering analysis (be aware of benchmarks, code reqt’s, targets, and KPIs)

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    [-] Andrea

    We must plant trees. And more trees!
    And protect the forests that are continually being slaughtered. If we adopt Diana Beresford-Kroeger’s plant laid out in http://calloftheforest.ca, we could slow down the effects of climate change. If the trees go, we go.

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    [-] Mary

    We drink less coffee so our fair trade coffee is not impossible to grow anymore due to climate catastrophe, we try to buy Canadian, we try not to purchase goods that have been shipped from Asia, eat no meat from grocery stores or restaurants unless it is local and humanely grown and humanely killed, we absolutely do not support any industrial agriculture as the animal abuse is awful and horrendous and the emissions are very high, do not purchase from Amazon because of all the wasteful packaging , be happy with less stuff, do not eat any GMO foods as spraying with glyphosate contributes to climate disasters, eat only organic and locally grown produce as much as possible, we don’t go on any trips that are not necessary, we visit family and get there the most fossil free way we can, don’t buy wild salmon, don’t eat wild salmon and don’t go near farm salmon. That is the only way the wild salmon stocks will return. We have to give them time to return. We wash all plastic bags and reuse over and over, grow as much as we can as food shortages are on the way and happening now, we don’t support any new pipelines or any new fossil fuel projects, we work for new sustainable green projects, we vote for parties that do not support new fossil fuel projects (don’t be a fossil fool), use much less paper, wash clothes & dishes only if we have a full load and try to hang laundry to dry, installed yellow blue from Pacific Eco products in our ceilings to cut down heat in summer and stay warmer in winter, we don’t use any insecticides or herbicides, try to use only natural soaps and beauty products, avoid microplastics and synthetic clothing, avoid single use plastic, always carry our own reuseable bags and go cups, buy only foods with no palm oil as orangutans are going extinct and buying palm oil products encourages farmers to set fire to the Amazon, we have wildfire hosing for our roof and an emergency kit, turn unnecessary lights off, use a slow cooker-less electricity, let the politicians know 11,000 scientists say we have little time to change and must triple our goals now.

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    [-] Michael

    I am a Metis-Canadian citizen living in Vancouver, BC. Please stop the climate hysteria. The only part of my life that has been affected is seeing crying teenagers in downtown Vancouver, weeping over the lies they’ve been told by their wealthy, privledged, Marxist college professors (who have multiple homes, cars and fly around the world) and who are desperate to institute an unending “climate tax” on Canadians (while lobbying for increased funding to their university employers). Canada can have ZERO affect on the climate of the earth, the two countries driving carbon emissions are India and China. Regardless, the Earth’s route cycles around the sun are measured in millions of years as it goes in and out of ice ages. The best thing you can do is start listening to actual scientists and not media and university administrators who know nothing. This article should help you as a starting point:

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2019/11/25/why-everything-they-say-about-climate-change-is-wrong/#470d253d12d6

    Please stop lying to people. Thank You.

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    [-] Rob

    Michael

    Thank you for your convinced contribution. But I don’t think I lie to people. I strive to be truthful. I’ve made it not just a career passion, but a personal one, to humbly seek truth and to seek to share that search as honestly as possible. I don’t always succeed.

    Perhaps the greatest, clearest statement on seeking truth I know came from Isaac Newton, who found nothing closer to ultimate truth than an explanation by pure reasoning people working together could arrive at solely from all available observation with least assumption, exception or omission so far as possible, until new observation led to better explanation. Newton’s Principle means we trust for truth no one, vest authority in no one, rely on no faith, but only on logical reason and repeatably observable phenomena. This Principle stated 300 years ago led to the greatest period of advancement in the human condition, in terms of health, wealth, welfare, peace, order, good government, security and safety, in history.

    Do you think it leads to lies?

    I see the more likely explanation being that all of us can see only part of what is knowable, and those different perspectives may be so different as to lead to opposing views of what that elephantine truth actually is.

    The truth I see is that Rubino et al (2013) proved fossil emissions explain entirely the rise in GHGs in atmosphere above natural equilibrium levels resulting from orbital forcings, and that rise is almost 50% above natural. I see from Fourier and Arrhenius that GHGs explain entirely the variable portion of global surface temperatures longer than the Hale Cycle (22 years) and shorter than Milankovitch Forcing (~20k-100k years). These results have been validated on over 26,500 independent datasets as of 2014, according to Dr. Katharine Hayhoe. There are over 1,000 new climate-related peer-reviewed scholarly works in science published a month now. That’s far too much for any one person to know; however, I do know only a handful in the last decade disputed that fossil fume emissions lead to global harm, and those reports have been refuted by reason and observation. However, I do have a dispute with them.

    Science, you see, is ruled by the principle of conservatism. Findings are supposed to be biased toward ‘the least surprising result’ in the minds of modern practitioners. In metastudies, the IPCC’s findings have been shown 19 times in 20 to be too conservative by one to three orders of magnitude where independently verifiable, for example by passage of time in the case of prediction, or greater collection of data.

    Are Greta and AOC and XR and McKibben the ones who are wrong?

    How do we know?

    Because a policy analyst says so?

    On the balance of probabilities, koala which depend in the wild on 31 extant species of water-loving eucalyptus are functionally extinct if those plants lose the streams and rivers they depend on. There are several such streams and rivers that in Australia’s decadal drought have dried up too much to support eucalyptus. McKibben isn’t wrong to point this out. Shellenberger seems more wrong to oversimplify it. Greta Thunberg’s book is a whole book: “end in 12 years” is a complete misrepresentation of it. I think the article you cite presents a one-sided truth, to lead to an unbalanced conclusion, not the way science seeks truth.

    And yet nowhere in Shellenberger’s article is an iota of support for the claims in your post.

    Canada is responsible for 1/7th the world’s fossil emissions, if you count all our exports and imports and their follow-on effects.

    China and India need to get their houses in order, too, but this isn’t a discussion with China or India: it’s us talking to each other.

    We can cut our fossil emissions to zero, practically, by 2028, and by 2024 the first of us to switch will be financially better off, as eVs and NetZero buildings are cheaper than their fossil equivalents within a few years. This applies to all our commerce, industry, farms, fishery and transport, too; our forests, our cities and towns and villages, our rural life, our wildlife, our tourism, our education.

    No Marxism necessary.

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    [-] Lee

    Interesting article and I totally agree with your comments about the media being irresponsible with their headlines as everyone moves towards “clickbait” type stories.

    However, the author of this story (in a business magazine which should raise a small red flag about bias towards economic development at the very least) himself says there is a middle ground between climate alarmism and climate denial. And i believe that the questions the government is asking, and the conversations they are hosting in forums such as this, are far from the alarmist rhetoric that the article quotes. So on that note, I think forums such as this are an excellent resource, so long as any nonsensical rhetoric is flagged as such and healthy discussion and debate grounded in reality remains.

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    [-] Lee

    In truth studies research or action plans will not work for climate change. We as humans are consumers and unless we as a world decide to go back to a simpler life climate change will continue. Unfortunately the rate is unknown the more we try to safe the worse we pollute. Eg: electric vehicles look at the open pit lithium mines they are devastating not to mention how much diesel fuel they most go through in order to mine. Basically come down to the big picture of finding a better way to do things overall. Industrial production is killing the planet and all species along with it. It starts with human change less technology and more practical lifestyles

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    [-] Rob

    Lee

    I respectfully disagree; going back to a simpler life would almost certainly be pointless, increase misery and do more harm than good overall, if we all did that in all things. We’re not monks, and we’re not cogs in a machine.

    Lithium mines are on the order of one ten thousandth as environmentally impacting per km driven as bitumen mines, and lithium is recyclable, compared to fossil fuels which are not, and of the 23% of fossil that can be recycled 98% isn’t. It’s the wrong end of the telescope to worry over lithium’s impacts while ignoring fossil’s; it’s making the perfect the enemy of the good.

    We can get out of fossil emission by 2028 entirely by padlocking pumps and chaining valves shut at a rate of 1/4 of 1/10th of 1% per day. If every consumer then does the next right thing in the context of being denied that 1/4000th of a wrong choice, whether they decide on lifestyle or technology, who are we to judge them for which decisions they make?

    And if we don’t padlock pumps and chain valves, if we still see present-day levels of fossil emissions after 2028, then by 2030 we are likely to see evidence that too many tipping points are reached for anything but the most unthinkably drastic geoengineering to much delay, along the path to global mass extinction of most life.

    Not, perhaps, Apocalypse, but given the choice of ending fossil or ending most life, I know which one I want to be on record choosing.

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    [-] Harold

    What can you and others do to prepare for impacts from climate change? Build homes with the 200 year flood in mind. Thicker walls of insulation for the extreme weather conditions. Storage rain water on site. Build or retrofit to net-zero standards. Solar panels, battery walls, Geo-exchange and electric vehicles will be the new standard. Sooner the better.

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    [-] Rob

    I hear what you way about floods, but this brings to mind the problem that it is no longer meaningful to discuss a #-year flood plain: patterns of precipitation and desertification are so altered already by climate change that many places, even places troubled more and more by perpetual and multi-year water shortfalls, have seen 500-year or 1000-year floods several years in a row, across BC (though nowhere close to what Eastern Canada sees).

    In general across the continent the west is drying and the east is getting more dumped on.

    Our best defense from this would be a rain shield from vegetation: something on the scale of a trillion trees planted (though only a tiny fraction would make it to maturity) and a billion trees harvested in an ongoing cycle every few decades.

    While those sound like market-flooding numbers, if BC is to avoid desertification, it must adapt to becoming essentially the world’s largest tree plantation, with more land devoted to preserving wildlife than ever before, but also land that has never hosted forests turned from mountainside and scrub to forced silviculture for rain shield. An upside, the waste wood from that harvest could become sustainable biofuel cheaper than bitumen-based fuel, and can draw down CO2 sequestered as biochar, mixed into the ground to amend soil and make it more CO2-absorbing.

    Biochar amended soils also are superior at reducing flood damage. If our point is to manage floods, it must be to manage precipitation, to steer moist air to where it will form winter snow packs and reverse that shrinking trend, and to integrate our approach across all disciplines and resources.

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    [-] Eric

    Managing water supply is my biggest concern. This isn’t something new to us but it is something I’m more aware of. I never thought this would be an issue in Canada. I see the increasing impacts of urbanisation and development as greenspace is converted to living space. Whether it is more pavement, more parks, or more condos, the end result is more limited water retention both in dry seasons and wet. The natural buffering effect is steadily being eroded. The creeks and ponds that supply my wells and crops are increasingly threatened. The provincial government ordered my neighbour to stop irrigating his fields this summer (under threat of significant fine) while the nearby commercial gravel pit kept pumping water from the same aquifer to wash rock for construction. He lost his crop.
    My own small community could say “enough development” . We don’t need to become an inexpensive bedroom community for the big city. Mayor and council love the increasing tax dollars they get to “invest to make our lives better” however we are just trading “stuff” for a reduced quality of life for ourselves and our children. Instead of deluding ourselves about “sustainable growth” perhaps we might switch our priority to become a more sustainable community. Sustainability begins at the local level.

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    [-] Lee

    Geez Eric I feel like you and I might be neighbours! I totally agree with your comments on the continued desire for growing economic development. I like in a small rural farm community which keeps endorsing the removal of productive farmland from the inventory to develop mini mcmansion subdivisions for people that want to live in a cute little quiet farm town but not actually farm. It’s an unsustainable mania.

    I’m no longer able to irrigate my land due to water shortages (which means in a reduction to locally produced food in my community) and yet everyone is still able to water their lawns and hose down their driveways (and yes those are small examples but everything adds up).

    I think the culture of economic growth at all costs needs to be seriously reconsidered. Shouldn’t net zero be a good thing? Maintain the economy locally. That “growth” has to come at a cost from somewhere.

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    [-] Charlotte

    Government could take it seriously, divest from fossil fuels and instead use that money to support workers transition to renewable projects. Every part of my life is and will continue to be impacted by climate change.

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    [-] Rob

    How much does Canada contribute to global CO2 emissions?
    a) 1.6% is our domestic index, a deceptive measure;
    b) 0.8% is our coal export, which nets to about 2/3rds of one percent due much of that being metallurgic (57% as intensive as thermal); essentially all of that goes through BC, though most is from AB, Montana and Wyoming. Coal is 43% of all emissions, making Canada’s contribution roughly 1/3rd of one percent, counting the economic effects from Canada’s supply.
    c) 1% is cement import and 1.1% is cement export; as cement is by far the largest fossil-intensive material produced (a list including steel and aluminum), the overall of fossil-intensive materials Canada contributes through trade is 2.1%.
    d) Oil and Gas exported from Canada is 6% of the world supply. This is compounded two ways: i) our bituminous products (tarsand, coal seam, fracking..) are 40% more intensive than conventional oil and natural gas, meaning our direct contribution is 8.4% of the world export market; ii) our (most heavily in the world) subsidized fossil sector’s contribution results in roughly 25% depression of world oil price due elasticity effects — we account for not just the 17.5% increase in oil shipped since 2008, but also roughly another 20% that would have resulted from buyers moving from fossil to alternatives. In this sense, Canada is responsible for some 40% of fossil import/export emissions. The world isn’t all export/import, some consumption is domestic in oil producing countries, but from that 33% of fossil emissions from oil & gas, Canada accounts for easily 10% of the world’s total.

    In total, Canada is 14% of the source of fossil emissions worldwide either directly or indirectly, mostly through heavily subsidized trade.

    If Canada phased out our contributions at a rate of just 1/4 of 1/10th of 1% a day, we would directly bring the world down to 86% of current emissions by 2028, and BC is a huge part of that. Moreover, our subsidized exports bring down world prices for fossil, substantially. Without our goods, the price spike in fossil would drive many to alternatives, starting a virtuous cycle expanding economies of scale for renewables, eVs and the like among our trading partners and their trading partners.

    If we’re not fossil free by 2030, the world passes 1.5C of warming, and so likely passes tipping points at 1.5 C warming making 6C warming inevitable.

    Adapting to fossil free by 2030, according to Nobel-winning economist William Nordhaus, costs 300 times less than adapting to that 6C degrees of warming. Moreover, as many fossil-free adaptations — NetZero buildings, renewable grids, eVs, eg — are net economic benefits after 2-5 years, we’re better to adapt to fossil free anyway, and the sooner the better.

    Key to this: padlock pumps and chain valves shut across all fossil-emitting goods, domestic and across borders, at a rate of 1/7th of today’s total a year, each year.

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    [-] Jesse

    Rob’s comment raises another possible need: Our communities need more public forums.

    Too few people know about the recent IPCC report noticing that our society has already passed the 1.5C threshold in 2019.

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    [-] Rob

    Could you link to that report, Jesse?

    I’d understood the present estimate to be 1.1 C to 1.25 C, and cannot locate at the IPCC website (ipcc.ch) the paper you mention.

    There is however the very overdue https://www.ipcc.ch/report/2019-refinement-to-the-2006-ipcc-guidelines-for-national-greenhouse-gas-inventories/ which updates the obsolete method for estimating domestic inventories.

    Under the new and more accurate standard, Canada’s contribution to global warming through domestic emission alone would go from about 1.6% to about 2.6% due correcting systemic underreporting issues.

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    [-] edna

    With shrinking glaciers in the Chilliwack River Valley and more flash rain storms followed by drought, I am using more rain barrels for water gardening and have been “wildfire-proofing” my property. This includes installing wildfire hoses on my house and clearing brush and low coniferous limbs back 30 feet from my house. There are a number of procedures that could be helpful and should be promoted by the BC government to homes interfacing with lands at high wildfire risk.

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    [-] Marley

    The air I breathe is being impacted by all of the emissions of fossil fuel vehicles on the roads, which is a known cause of climate change. This will continue to impact my life (and that of others) by discouraging active transportation (e.g. it is discouraging to ride a bike when you smell the exhaust fumes more on a bike than when you are driving in a vehicle). Smoke from wildfire further discourages active transportation, leading people to drive around more in their vehicles (and creating more emissions that exacerbate the whole climate change problem).

    What am I doing:
    I have chosen to drive a fully electric vehicle (EV) for my personal vehicle for 6 years now. I have saved thousand of dollars in fuel and maintenance, and tons of emissions. I have educated lots of people about my vehicle choices through in-person discussions and a blog. I also ride my bike instead of driving regularly.

    What could the government do:
    To demonstrate real commitment to climate change action, the province should purchase at least one fully electric vehicle for every single government office that uses fleet vehicles, and install at least one charging station at every single office. This would go a long way to improving both their image, and providing an opportunity for thousands of employees to realize what a great option these vehicles are. They are great for both mitigating further climate change, and for saving money, as the entire cost of ownership of an EV is demonstrated to be much lower than a gasoline powered car when you include the purchase cost, the fuel costs and the maintenance costs. I truly believe that once people are able to try driving an EV (via there being one provided to every office fleet), they will quickly realize what an advantage EVs offer in terms of costs savings, performance and emissions, and will prefer them over fossil fuel vehicles. The BC government should be leading this by example.

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    [-] Julia

    Food security will be an issue in the future as food production and reliability of food sources will be impacted. i am preparing by planting a small garden and learning to grow food in small space. as well i am learning to preserve food so there is fresh produce year round. i also try to connect with people who are interested in and doing food preservation to share ideas.
    What govt /municipalities can do is support local food production more through bylaws and ensuring food security by preserving and increasing land both large and small for food productiion. creative use of green space to use for community gardens. Provide opportunity for learning skills for gardening and food preservation.

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    [-] kimdale

    please please please earmark sunshine coast earls cove to gibsons for a regular frequent bus service as all of us use and go up and down driving our cars on the one road, highway 101. it is a no brainer, please lets have a bus service, hourly, or 3 times a day and get the emissions down and the call from drviers for new additional highway redundant.

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    [-] Daena

    Honestly, I’m personally disturbed by the way this survey is marketed at “adaptation strategies” and asks “how likely do you FEEL this and that will affect your community”. I think this is misleading, and not only does it skip over the idea of prevention – it talks about adaptation like a walk in the park. More than that, how are my “feelings” about the likelyhood of a disaster in my area relevant? Likelyhood is determined by scientific modeling and study and making predictions based on evidence. If you ask the general public if they are worried about sea level rise in their community and they say ‘no’, does that tell us there is no threat? Or does it tell us we have an uninformed public that is not yet aware of the connections between climate change events beyond the scope of our small communities…
    We need the Government to be clear, honest and forthcoming about the current, best available science and right now that science is telling us we need strong action now to prevent and mitigate the worst effects of climate change. Period. You don’t get to brush past this step. We have wasted 30 years debating and denying climate change, we have a small window now to take action and we MUST. The “easier” thing for goverments to do would be to calmly act as though climate change is inevitable and we are “engaging the public to build an adaptation strategy”. These are warm and fuzzy words that entail zero action being taken. Act now to reduce fossil fuel emissions and transition to green renewable energy quickly. You want to know what I think the government should do? That is what I want my government to do. Act. Now. Sorry, but these surveys are a distraction and a waste of time and money.

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    [-] Louise

    Daena – I totally agree we need strong action to prevent and mitigate the worst effects of climate change. That’s what the government’s CleanBC plan is about. At the same time, even if GHG emissions went to zero tomorrow, we would still need to respond to climate impacts that are already underway as a result of past GHGs in the atmosphere. That’s why we also need a climate preparedness and adaptation strategy. Scientific studies and climate modeling are absolutely critical to understand projected climate impacts and how to prepare. The Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, funded by government, is all about modeling these changes for B.C. There’s also the BC government’s 2019 Preliminary Climate Risk Assessment that studied the likelihood and consequences for 15 key risk scenarios for B.C. However, the point of this engagement with the general public is to understand what people know and are experiencing in terms of climate change to see if there are other areas that need attention, and to understand where people are at in terms of education and awareness.

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    [-] Karen

    Water Shortages. We really need to think about what this will mean and change the licensing legislation. It’s more and more common in the news to hear of places where water bottling companies are just pumping away while the public has to buy the water back. We can’t let this happen. We can’t be giving licenses to companies who want to bottle our water and ship it overseas. It’s too precious a resource and once they are in, we can’t get them out. The WSA is fine to regulate domestic, agricultural and even industrial use, but the big difference with bottling is that you will never satiate that market, whereas there is a natural cap on usage for all other uses. You can only irrigate so much. Our water will become our most precious resource and we need to have strong language around protecting it.

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    [-] Brian

    – we are paying attention to the changes
    – need protection for water use for farm animals and food production
    – continue with the science development of new plants and grasses that require less water
    – info about how to develop plan

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    [-] Mauren

    I can prepare by not buying a house that is close to sea level or water source such as a river. I might be able to get sand and bags for emergency flooding. I could get emergency food and water and store these; there are such things available. I could investigate how other people cope, who do not have heat in the world.

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    [-] Mauren

    This may seem extreme, but I sometimes think about what it would be like if we did not have cheap food from cheap energy sources, and we had no heat and no wastewater systems. The following recent CBC investigative journalism was very interesting. Here, we see a group of women in war-torn Eastern Ukraine living in a bunker wearing coats for warmth. https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/in-an-obliterated-landscape-war-weary-ukrainians-hope-peace-summit-ends-fighting-1.5388173

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    [-] Rebecca

    Require all new roofing to be white or light in colour to reduce urban heat island effects

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    [-] Rebecca

    I think those of us in urban areas will need to give up cars as much as possible. It would make sense for the province to subsidize electric bikes much more. Subsidies on electric cars are good too, but they are much more energy intensive to create and run as compared to e-bikes. Also the infrastructure required for cars is much more expensive and impactful than for bikes.

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    [-] Brian

    Well said! Within urban areas we should reduce our investment in cars and associated infrastructure. We will improve public health, community design and lower our carbon footprint by offering alternatives. Some people still need to drive, but many only drive due to a lack of safe and/or convenient alternatives.

    Much more emphasis should be placed on active transportation, public transportation and infrastructure to reduce car volumes. Even if we switch cars to electric, they have a heavier material footprint than electric-assist bikes. Single occupancy vehicles are also the most space-inefficient vehicle type. This is particularly evident in Canada with the number of SUVs and pickup trucks. The geometry just doesn’t work as population density increases. It’s simple math.

    Many cities have public transportation options, car share programs and are now joining the 21st century by building protected bike lanes. And to those who oppose bike lanes, guess what…getting urban dwellers out of their cars and onto bikes clears traffic from the road.

    We sold our car many years ago and switched to bikes & transit. For larger items we now have an electric-assist cargo bike which covers most of our needs. If biking, walking or taking the bus won’t suffice (which is rare), our car share membership handles everything else. I’m now seeing less and less of a probability that I will ever own another car. Moving forward, it’s a rare on-demand service rather than an owned resource.

    The solutions to fix urban transportation networks and community design are proven and documented. Let’s get to work.

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    [-] Jesse

    Climate change will affect every part of my life: air quality, water availability, food security, work opportunities, recreational opportunities, places to live.

    We must achieve open discussions and collaborations about what we as communities feel is most important about our communities and what we as communities will do to adapt and address that baked-in climate change.

    We need to be on track with a vision for how we can navigate the baked-in climate changes. This is a beginning of an infinite game where we must implement empirical process control to _steer_ through our uncertain future. To put away our reliance on plans that rely on perfect knowledge of the future.

    Can we build into our society more decentralized mechanisms for communities to use?

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    [-] Kim

    I think it will simply be harder to live in my home due to costs going up to accommodate climate change. I wish that there were home-owner based distributed source solutions, like installing solar panels on my south facing roof and collecting solar energy that I would store into the grid or into a neighborhood grid. Over the long term, this would save a lot of costs and be more climate neutral than current system. I wish that this type of solution was on offer.

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    [-] Robert

    Beyond the obvious personal and community actions to reduce emissions, each community needs to begin serious planning to address risks and impacts, and enhance economic, psychological, and ecological resilience. I am planning to help start such a process in my community.

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    [-] Lois

    While some really effective actions require capital outlay which many citizens cannot afford, there are still things we can do to reduce the pace of climate change. Reallocating surplus family dollars (if you have any) to gradually incorporate things like heat pumps and electric cars, use public transportation where it is effective (denser urban centers) rather than individual vehicles, growing our own food even in containers on our decks to reduce fuel costs of transporting food to us, exchange light bulbs, use toaster oven rather than large oven, open drapes for solar heat on sunny days, ride bikes or walk to store when possible time and distance wise. All small actions (except the expensive ones) that add up to good sized climate change chunk.
    Attend or watch streamed council meetings to know what your council is proposing and enacting. You might discover they are contrary to positive climate action and you may need to write them letters, do a presentation, write letters to the editor. When politicians discover we, everyday citizens, do not only want but demand climate action, we will get it.
    Join a group of environmental volunteers to educate those in your community. The more people know, they more they will act for positive climate action. Even get on their mailing lists to stay up to date on local discussions.
    Plant a tree on your property, request your strata or management company plant more trees. They can be fruit trees that yield food, sun protection in the summer and allow sun through in the winter. Buy locally grown food to reduce fossil fuel costs of transporting it, and organic or not GMO food which means it is not being sprayed with pesticides that destroy so much of nature’s natural balance.
    Rely less on social media information which is so often just opinions based on distorted facts. Large corporations have much to gain by all of us blithely continuing as we are now and ignoring changes needed for climate control. Most media are arms of large corporations and controlled by financial gain articles not socially responsible articles.
    When purchasing a home, plan to plant trees not clear cut, don’t buy on a flood plain or on top of a creek bed or wet land that has been filled in to create building lots that cannot stand rising waters or heavy rains.
    In short, we all need to be responsible for our actions, which means understanding the impact of our actions. This can only happen as we become more informed.
    Hopefully the government will start major grant funding for some of the more expensive items so people other than the top 20% can afford to participate. Involvement of all citizens will make a huge difference.
    We can each bite off one piece each month. Talk it up with our friends and neighbours, create challenges or go solo and private. I found it important to just keep moving forward with my eye on constantly reducing the GHG footprint. If we all do it, soon it will be just the way we live, not an exception.

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    [-] Bryan

    Individual action is the tiniest way for us to address the climate emergency. It is a divide and conquer strategy developed to distract us from the truly big emitters. On that front, BC CANNOT afford more fossil fuel development. Period. The biggest pie wedges are big business not individuals. And when it comes to individuals do the CHEAP thing — regulate. Set more aggressive EV quotas and place a GHG tax on gas cars, and use the revenue to give an incentive for EVs. Other than that, we need to aggressively encourage BC agricultural development — not just in the ALR where farmers can’t house their workers easily for all the red tape, but anywhere where land can be amended to produce. California won’t be a bread basket for long if you look at any water and climate modelling. Food security has to be a priority. But again, these are regulatory matters. This is not about everyone saving their twist ties.

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    [-] Jules

    We’re reliant on the ground water that feeds our wells. Many people’s wells dry up during the summer, and people rely on a water delivery service. People on a neighbouring island were left without water when their private water delivery business shut down. We should be installing many more cisterns, and harvesting rainwater when it’s plentiful. A rent-to-own, publicly funded system would make a huge difference here. Same goes for heat pumps and solar panels. We could significantly cut down on vehicle use if there was a public transit option.

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    [-] Jules

    We urgently need to address the fire hazard of all the young cedars that have died as our climate has become drier. The woods are full of them, and they should be taken down and chipped to hold moisture, instead of being left up to burn.

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    [-] Minette

    Every part of our lives will be affected. Food prices will increase. Air quality will decrease. Our natural eco system will continue to die. We’ll be seeing less bees, less greenery, dirty waters. I generate as little waste as possible, carpool as often as I can, avoid buying new, eat organic food, eat little meat etc. There’s nothing that I can do that will make a change. Our leaders need to stand up and make a bold change. The government should give higher financial incentives to citizens to buy electric vehicles, install water capturing systems, make it mandatory for there to be more than 1 person per vehicle, free public transportation, tax big carbon generators, etc.

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    [-] sue

    Community renewable power generation, community gardens, and neighborhood waste management. We need to move away from mega projects serving vast geographies. Re-localize most aspects of economy. Increase public transportation hugely and electrify it. Get people out of their cars and re-allocate money spent on that infrastructure to public good.

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    [-] lauren

    I would like to see an increased effort by all towns to make public transportation accessible and affordable. By that i mean it is a lot easier to jump on a bus and it be either free or negligible than start up a car, be it electric or gas. It is a must that we change the mentality of people when it comes to taking public transport. I live in an area where the growth is outpacing our infrastructure, Comox BC. There is constant talk about building a new bridge due to traffic. The need to keep using resources to continuously grow has to be curtailed. The impact on the environment is too detrimental. so train people to take public transport- make it easy, cheap, plentiful, easy to put bikes and pets on.

    The next step is the stopping of clearcut forestry practices. It is a crime what is happening to the forests which moderate everything from climate to forest fires to water. Just STOP. Our water in Comox is so compromised due to the clearcuts at Comox lake. I find it appalling that this is still occurring and that money and corporations still run the government. In fact I feel that whoever is going to read this already knows what really needs to be done- why should i waste my time again writing. Many of us have been writing for decades but the government/corporations march on to their destructive tune.

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    [-] Concerned

    My life is already impacted by climate change. We have to do something about it. I try to not drive whenever i can and walk and bike. I advocate for mass transit and rail investment for RURAL BC. We need to put investment into non-motorized greenways and trails between and within our communties. I have taken money out of investments that fund the fossil fuel industry. I love for politicians that believe in climate change and global warming. I vote. I have helped with education and talk to my friends and people I live and work with to share facts not fake news about the climate. There needs to be massive investment in convincing people that they can do something. Naomi Klein has many good books about what needs to be done. The United Nations knows what needs to be done. We have to care about everyone instead of only thinking about ourselves. We have to get outside of the prisoners’ dilemna and act like leaders in our communities and our politics.

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    [-] Steve

    I expect that climate change will affect my outdoor recreation opportunities to some extent. Ski season will become shorter and less reliable, although some years there may be lots of snow. Summer outdoor activities will be constrained by wildfires, backcountry access restrictions, and road closures. Shoulder seasons may be affected by more storms and extreme precipitation events. These kinds of challenges are also likely to increase maintenance and drainage requirements for my home and yard. I know I am more thoughtful about the impacts of home maintenance, construction and landscaping decisions on drainage, shade, and cooling.

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    [-] sue

    Create personal and community food systems encompassing full circular model, water collection, community sized waste management and re-use, community energy grids, emergency preparedness for households, create sharing economy opportunities, abandon building on flood plains, re-wild shorelines, cooperative seed saving and local seed banks, right to repair laws and training

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    [-] Bruce

    I’m not so concerned about ‘preparing for climate change’. I’d rather be part of the solution. This involves voting for governments and elected official who recognize the urgent issue that climate change poses to human and animal life on the planet. Some jurisdictions are beginning to take serious steps to addressing climate change. Vancouver for example is a real leader in North America in the area of sustainable, energy efficient building and construction standards; and Vancouver is putting the right kind of priority on transportation infrastructure that is an important piece of the climate change solution puzzle.

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    [-] Brittney

    This will affect my life in every aspect. My job is outside. If temperatures are too hot in the summer, I can’t work. I’m nog currently doing anything to prepare, because I don’t know what I can do.

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    [-] Jess

    1. Very few Canadian homeowners, biz or towns have surface (does not come up thru a drain) flood insurance. Was not available in Canada til 2 yrs ago & is very pricey.
    2. Most of the work & taxes is on us for municipal actions & insurance increases.
    3. This adaptation study excludes the causes of climate change so excuses the regulator- govt. 4. The way to make the govt pay attention is to tie climate accountability to govt by suggesting govt pay half of All homeowner & municipal insurance increases.
    BC homeowners are not yet seeing much insurance increase, but ask Quebec about $$$ insurance for flooding. Quebec is leading the provinces to agree on a national FEMA- like flood insurance program.
    Call your insurer for details.
    https://www.insurancebusinessmag.com/ca/news/catastrophe/the-climate-change-transport-truck-about-to-rearend-canada-166758.aspx

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    [-] mitchel

    all of our leisure activities are based around nature. these climate changes will affect everything we do!! hiking, camping, watersports (surfing, kayaking, …), ocean animals (whales, fish, …)

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    [-] Kris

    Government at all levels could invest in mass transit such as light rapid-transit rail because bike lanes and bus lanes are not going to do it for many. Look to systems around the world that are successful

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