Discussion 5: How are you planning to adapt to the risks and opportunities of a changing climate?



The Province is doing critical work through CleanBC to reduce our emissions and take action on climate change. But greenhouse gas emissions already in the atmosphere will continue to cause changes over the coming decades. Preparing for climate change is about understanding these changes and developing appropriate measures to respond and be prepared. It’s what we call being “climate-ready”. The threat of climate change is real – but so are the opportunities to find new and creative approaches to address the changes to come. Climate is built into all our decisions, from how and where we build our homes to how we grow our food and effectively use our water.
 
Addressing changes to our climate will require individuals, businesses, and all levels of government to work together to find innovative responses. Those taking steps to include climate change in their decision making will be in the best position to take advantage of potential opportunities, reduce the costs of potential impacts and be prepared for the future.

Question 5: In the sector you are working in, how are you helping reduce the risks climate change poses to your business and take advantage of potential opportunities? How would you like to see others reduce their risk or prepare for opportunities? Are there success stories that you can share with us?

Share photos of the changes you are seeing on social media and tag #ClimateReadyBC and #MyClimateStoryBC

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13 responses to “Discussion 5: How are you planning to adapt to the risks and opportunities of a changing climate?

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    [-] Rob

    Years ago, I moved to become so fossil-free as I could: the leanest personal vehicle, the most efficient home, the most local diet, public transit, and continuously studying the subject.

    This of course is not enough.

    I participated in Climate 101 online, in PICS, in Project Drawdown. As Greta Thunberg observed, nothing got done.

    I applaud BC’s Revenue Neutral Carbon Tax Act, what the World Bank has described as the textbook example of how to do carbon tax. But it’s too low by ten to twenty times to have the desired effect, and anyone who understands retail psychology knows that low prices are sale prices, and sale prices push more buying.

    I plan to adapt by pushing for pumps to be padlocked, and valves chained shut, at a rate of 1/4 of 1/10th of 1% a day, the equivalent of Canada’s 7 busiest gas stations and a proportional share of all other fossil-emitting equipment and activity, because from a standpoint of project management, there is no other critical path for action that can succeed to mitigate the threat of exceeding the temperature that will turn on positive feedbacks that take us to 6C degrees of warming, and 6C degrees of warming means global mass extinction of most life.. which could get expensive.

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    [-] Julia

    I believe that adaptation requires preparation now rather than waiting to see what happens. Preparation for me includes biking more rather than driving a car, learning to live with less, buying local and learning to preserve food. This has had a wonderful benefit as i am learning what’s important in life and enjoying the process of being more connected to nature and food.

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    [-] Mike

    We currently aren’t seeing impacts that we can directly attribute to climate change as the local events we now experience are well within the range of normal climate cycles over the past several years. If you have evidence to suggest that we are seeing local impacts due to climate change increase I look forward to seeing it.
    What we are certainly experiencing is the impact of increasing uncontrolled development in our community (cut, blast, bulldoze, build and pave) with no consideration for sustainability. We’re seeing a reduction in the ability of our water systems to absorb storm events and greater propensity for flash floods. Trees are dying because their summer water supply has been interrupted. We’re seeing the District take land out of the ALR for development projects (how can an Asroturf playing field qualify as a green project in the ALR?). We’re seeing community plan steadily change so that we can justify more development. We’ve seen far too many permits issued for areas already in flood plains, flood-prone areas and unstable slopes. Just wait for the next flood and then the owners will be asking for government assistance or support to rebuild or buy them out .
    We’ve commissioned our own data collection with a view to ensuring we can hold the District responsible when their actions result in property damage. By putting them on notice we’ve already seen greater attention being paid to designs to reduce downstream impacts of their rapacious development plans. The threat of lawsuit seems to be the only message they understand.
    I’m puzzled by the question: how would you like to see others reduce their risks or prepare for opportunities… What sort of arrogant society do you think we live in where it is appropriate to tell others what to do with their lives? Who writes this stuff? The question should be withdrawn and replaced with: What actions can you take to reduce your risk and prepare for opportunities? Followed by – and what steps are you actually taking to do this? I suppose it depends on your perspective on whether you believe it is important for government to have a big role in your everyday life or whether you show some initiative and develop personal responsibility. We can’t afford to have big government as the solution to all that affects us.
    As for “what supports we’ll need as impacts from climate change increase” I would argue a clear message from government on what they won’t do thereby making it quite clear that there is a need for individual and community responsibility for addressing some issues. For example: government will not be providing funding to mitigate water damage in flood zones (and a map to go with it), government will not provide funding to mitigate fire damage in areas where local regulations have limited forest management or preventative burning, no funding for damages in slide zones or where development has contributed to instability of slopes or waterways, etc.
    In summary, end the “big brother” concept of government being everywhere to do everything for everybody and start imparting the sense of personal and local responsibility for matters that should more appropriately be within their own control.

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    [-] Trevor

    We can’t attribute local changes to climate formally because the statistics requires to separate out human induced impacts from natural climate variability are too demanding for a single station. However, temperature changes at a Western North America scale, precipitation changes at BC’s latitudes, streamflow changes in BC”s major watersheds, and increased wildfire risk in BC have all been formally attributed to climate change. That is, in all of those changes, what we have experienced historically is not consistent with normal climate cycles and can only be explained by human influence.

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    [-] Mauren

    We are getting used to travelling by EV car, which means only going about 100 kms away. We do have an old SUV for trips from 100-400 kms away, but we don’t do that very often, because for one, we are now way more attuned to the emissions from this and other gas cars on the road. It seems weird to burn gas in an ICE now. For us, there are no apparent opportunities that climate change is going to bring. It means living with less, staying put and getting used to it.

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    [-] Jesse

    I would like to see more serious discussion about what our community will do to adapt to what we know we can expect; whether that is climate changes already baked into the atmosphere or socio-economic shifts that emerge from understanding how to become a sustainable society.

    Ideas our communities must discuss:
    * what do we intend to do in the face of baked-in climate changes? (all impacts visible when downscaling climate models to our regions)
    * dependence on energy slaves
    * unseen embedded energy
    * development patterns (infrastructure debt from subdivisions)
    * economic and ownership structures (democracy at work?)
    * supply chain complexity and energy
    * repair, ownership, modularity, material content of goods, circularity
    * modern monetary theory and ideas from Positive Money

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    [-] Robert

    I recognize that climate change will increase the risk of disruptions in food, water, energy and other essentials. I am increasing the degree to which I am able to produce food on my own land, to reduce the risks, and believe that everyone with a lawn should consider doing the same. As a wealthy nation, we may not be the ones to feel the depths of a food crunch, because we can “out-bid” those in poorer nations. However, passing the food insecurity and in some cases food shortage to others is not a moral action.

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    [-] Bryan

    I am working with my community to develop a climate action plan to mitigate and adapt Salt Spring Island to withstand the changes that are underway. We will not be able to do that without provincial support as the recommendations coming out of our report to be released Spring 2020 will require funding for the Islands Trust and the CRD to develop.

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    [-] Arika

    I would love to say that the sector that I work in has a good understanding of climate change impacts – but it does not. And, in addition, I work at a large institution that really struggles with change. Ironically, when people think they are being ‘risk averse’ they are actually opening themselves up to more risk in a changing climate by refusing to change decision making processes. My sector has not reflected meaningfully on how much we assume a stable climate and environment in our decision making. We are bad at navigating uncertainty and really afraid of innovation and change. So I’m not optimistic.
    Personally I’m trying to get by with less and repurpose more in my life. I’m learning to grow more food, which make me much more aware of both natural variability and the long term effects of climate change (when reading older gardening books for my area). I think community building is also important, we’ll need eachother more. I don’t know that I’m doing enough about that, but we have a book club on our block so I know most of my neighbours.

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    [-] Concerned

    We have to stop burning fossil fuels. We have to have leadership to do this as quickly as possible. There needs to be a governmental campaign to convince people climate change and global warming is real and that we will have to give up our lifestyle and change our behaviours.

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    [-] sue

    Invested in electric vehicle and reduced use of personal vehicle, increased personal food growing, volunteer with groups promoting resiliency – personal and community, participate in coalitions and political action, reduced consumption of everything, more effective management of emergency kits and supplies, skill and knowledge building

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    [-] keith

    There are no risks climate change is a hoax. Like all the other global environment concerns before it.

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    [-] mitchel

    i work in the construction / project management industry. i believe the increase in natural disasters will create a lot of necessary repair work.

    hopefully, the industry can be proactive and start working on new sustainable energy projects, carbon capture initiatives, infrastructure to prepare for the effects of climate change, etc

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