Additional Questions



We would also like to receive feedback on the following:

  • What challenges are we missing?
  • What currently works well in BC for wildlife/habitat management?
  • What changes in wildlife/habitat management are most needed for BC (i.e., what are the highest priority challenges)?
  • Are there any challenges or opportunities listed that concern you? Why?

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74 responses to “Additional Questions

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    [-] Jason

    You’re missing the challenge of controlling healthy Grizzly bear populations near small towns (such as Terrace) where its not uncommon for a bear to stroll into the edges of town. Remove the Grizzly ban. This was one area of wildlife management where the gov’t was actually doing a pretty good job, as grizzly numbers were stable or increasing in all areas where they’re located except for two. Why not ban grizzly hunting only in areas where their population is struggling? Harvesting only 300 bears per year out of a population of more than 15,000 was working great. Now I fear there will be more dangerous human/grizzly interactions as their populations will skyrocket without proper predator management. Please re-think the grizzly bear hunting ban. Decisions like this should be based on science, not based on populism from people who don’t live anywhere close to grizzly bears and will never have to worry about encountering them.

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    [-] Chris

    Lack of CO officers, need to employ more
    The need to deal with the lack of harvest reporting by first nations
    Enforcement of Poaching needs to be equal for all
    Penalties for poaching need to be increased from a slap on the wrist(taking someones right to hunt away when they are a poacher does nothing to deter)

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    [-] Ken

    Don’t forget or neglect that citizens need access to our outdoors and atv clubs are a unique way older citizens can get out and enjoy our outdoors. Find a balance.

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    [-] Scott

    I believe the highest priorities moving forward are,
    1. Having more funding going directly back into wildlife management
    2. Keeping social politics out of science based wildlife management
    3. Stop having special rules for different peoples in this country, that will only create more divide and hurt our wildlife more
    4. Government supporting more predator management
    5. Habitat protection

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    [-] Lesley

    1. The government needs to fix the enforcement agency – the BC Wildlife Conservation Officer Service. This agency is a policing agency whose mandate is public safety – NOT wildlife management. Citizens need clarity on what is/what’s not in the COS’ scope of authority. BC Gov needs (with great urgency) to establish an independent review board to oversee the COS. Currently, any complaints made about individual constables or the COS as a whole are reviewed for themselves/by themselves. Failure to clean up the COS has already resulted in a measurable loss of public trust, multiple complaints, negative public relations and now a lengthy court battle.
    2. The BC government needs to promote, fund and support wildlife rehabilitation centres. Wildlife rehabilitation centres are an important part of wildlife management – restoring injured/orphaned/native wildlife back to health so they can be returned the the wild. Currently, wildlife rehab centres operate on a shoestring. Wildlife is the government’s property. And the government should be supporting rehab efforts AND establishing funding for oiled wildlife.

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    [-] Rob

    What challenges are we missing? why does govt never mention the elephant in the room, logging is reducing populations of everything form goshawks to mt caribou yet you can’t mention it as a major factor why this is just plain criminal negligence, stop clear cuts and their road networks In critical animal habitat, remember the cod fisheries, we cant go on lie there is no tomorrow

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    [-] Ian

    1) It has already been stated that the strategies for change must be driven by science and evidence. The problem has been with the robustness of the evidence and the incomplete nature of the information. For one, there needs to be more field biologists, and I mean a substantially larger number. These professionals need to be remunerated commensurate with their expertise and extensive education. They have proven to be essential in developing a sentinel network to identify early warning signs. Unfortunately, they lack the funding to act upon those signs.

    One key are where a more scientific approach is needed, is in wildlife census roles. The limits for hunters do not reflect realities in terms of harvestable numbers (Moose as an example, particularly south of the Prince George area, where numbers are extremely poor)

    2) Enforcement. The government has begun the process of hiring personnel to investigate and enforce whether water wells are registered, yet the damage being caused by rampant off-road use in many areas, the garbage, vandalism, wildlife harassment and introduction of non-native species is at a crisis point in areas such as the Shuswap-Thompson region. A stronger presence is desperately needed in terms of the Conservation Service, who should be imbued with the full capabilities and authority of any police officer in BC.

    3) Clear cut logging. While this resource plays an important role in our economy, it is having a significant impact on wildlife, aesthetics and the environment. The use of defoliants to suppress after-growth is impacting the food source of ungulates.
    4) Free Range Cattle: I would assert that there is little or no science that goes into determine if or how many cattle should be allowed to graze. With the recent trend towards hotter, drier climate, I have witnessed first hand how grazing is completely obliterated by grazing cattle. Ranchers have the option of supplementing the cattle diet with feed, but the local fauna are starved. I have personally observed emaciated and underweight deer going into winter. I made a point of expressing concern over the utter obliteration of every edible blade and leaf in our valley because of cattle, yet nothing has been done to address this. Cattle are destructive, heavy feeders that profoundly impact the ecosystem for native fauna. This issues is in desperate need of a scientific review and ongoing oversight.

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    [-] Yingyan

    The current management model didn’t allow the local organizations to show their full potential. The local community could play a key role in educating local residents and identify local issues. The government should empower them in reducing human caused conflict and violation of wildlife act. Instead the local community doesn’t have much say in enacting legislation. They are suppressed by the agencies to serve as a mounth piece. While the agencies should be proactive enforce law and prevent violation, they waste time and resources running around removing problem wildlife. The government agencies should be a supporting partner instead of a dictating voice.

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    [-] bert

    If you read my other comments you will has some of these answers. One biggest problems in the past come about when trying to reach consensus with stakeholders. It is obvious that the consensus approach leads to failure. Money and jobs always win. That is why I suggested that managing wildlife and habitat as we have in the past will only accelerate the decline. It has to be on a par with revenue and jobs in other fields

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    [-] Lee

    Challenges missing include the need for a BC provincial Endangered Species Act. The Federal Species-at-Risk Act only covers Federal lands not Crown and public lands.
    The other challenge missing and one of the highest priority challenges is futuristic thinking for protecting the integrity of 50% of the land-based ecosystems in BC through land management programs to buffer climate change and allow for the movement of species-specific protected areas as temperatures make current reserves unsuitable.

    Highest priority challenge is long-term funding – to get biologist in the field to assess populations, increase and restore Ministry of Environment staff, to ensure wildlife and habitat conservation staff have a science based purpose outside of political interference, to ensure funding is available for staff to get past paper reports and take action on initiatives, increase Park Rangers. Interpreter staff and monitoring staff, to establish Crown land Rangers. and to have enough eyes in the woods to enforce infractions and get control of damaging human recreation activities on Crown lands.

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    [-] Annie

    I am biased, of course, but we do need better research funding to figure out the solutions. Funding for research in these areas is very hard to come by.

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    [-] matt

    my concern: we spend too much time researching and not actually doing anything. Research is important, but if the research has already been done in geographically-similar areas, lets makes use of that hard work and put the recommendations into practice.

    The cliche, ‘Researching things to death’ applies to this situation.

    We also need our government to do something without worrying about re-election. Stop appeasing people, and start making rational (science-based) decisions.

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    [-] Chris

    Wildlife management and habitat conservation is not a place for politics. It provides no stability and often is counterproductive to the intent of wildlife management and habitat conservation. Again STOP the SJW talk and treat people the same, no one’s voice carries more weight because of their heritage.

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    [-] Rick

    Stronger enforcement of poaching. Perhaps begin using technology to monitor road access with cameras. At least in this case COs would know where to begin their investigations when poaching is discovered by knowing what vehicles were in the area. By making it public knowledge that road access is being electronicallly monitored would act a deterent to stop poaching. Start by doing this on higher risk areas. Put up signs saying that roads are electronically monitored. Use social media and other forms of advertising to spread the word. This initiative could also benefit by reducing vandalism of heavy equipment, personal property and garbage dumping. Perhaps the cost to implement the monitoring systems could be shared by other government organizations or even private industry.

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    [-] Alexander

    One thing that I would like to mention and that no one is talking about is that when logged areas are replanted, they are not planted with sufficient biodiversity of trees. It is in the logging company’s best interest to plant only the fastest growing, valuable trees with the maximum density. This mono-culture plant and tree species results in a forest which does not even slightly approximate the biodiversity which was present before the logging occurred. What follows is a mountain side which looks more like a Christmas tree farm than a natural forest. This density of short trees with minimal biodiversity is poor habitat for all species. Additionally it is more prone to disease and fire (not that fire is bad. Usually fire is good).

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    [-] Dylan

    Making decisions based on political pressures, as opposed to science-based, proven models. Shutting down the grizzly hunt was purely a political move, and was contradictory to how our wildlife management should be managed.

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    [-] Ernie

    The present Limited Entry System leaves much to be desired. The BC government has lost many hunters who used to apply for LEH tags due to their lack of success. Many jurisdictions offer point systems that increase their odds over time assuring them of a tag at some point. Many residents many never have a chance to hunt an animal in their own backyard that they admire and quite often are the caretakers. I personally have applied for a mule deer doe draw for over 20 years…the odds are quite often under 4.1 and I still cannot get a tag. Many people not only get one tag but sometimes as many as four. This system is archaic at best and the government is losing money over it.

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    [-] Ray

    The current system would benefit from dedicated resourcing from licenses and equipment taxes. The current suite of program biologists are generally under resourced and staffed but are best equipped manage wildlife across province and the current approach doesn’t require major changes.
    Biggest challenges are limited land use and habitat protection tools.

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    [-] Mike

    Professional reliance must be changed asap, growing forest solely for timber without consideration for habitat needs to change asap. Road density and access needs to be reduced dramatically and quickly all over the province. Change in the provinces prescribed burn program (there isn’t actually a program but there should be!) More funding for wildlife more counts. Meaningful objectives should follow quickly.

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    [-] John

    As consumptive users of wildlife, we continue to preach to the converted.
    We need to expand the environmental knowledge base to all citizens so everyone understands the complexities of not only wildlife management but the impacts humans are having on the planet, and why we can no longer simply ” let nature take its course”. A comprehensive environmental studies program from K-12 should be part of every students experience so eventually everyone fully understands why controversial decisions need to be made to protect the environment and manage its various inhabitants.

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    [-] Mark

    My comment will address the following question: What challenges are we missing?

    The largest and most important challenge that is missing in this review is the process of defaunation that is occurring globally. I don’t think that the scale of the problem is recognized here. Scientists have essentially determined that we are headed toward a scorched earth before the end of this century. This is a red-alert last ditch opportunity for governments to recognize the scale of the problem and start acting on this as an emergency – it is an emergency. There is no longer an endangered species – all species are at risk – including us. Scientists have issued multiple warnings to humanity and predicted patterns associated with climate change are hitting the target at the upper end of the confidence interval (i.e., worse than predicted). Scientists have taken a cautionary approach in the hopes that governments would act responsibly. There has been an inadequate response.

    There are articles in Nature and Science telling us (I’m a professional biologist) that the worlds wildlife and habitat are experiencing continuing declines, the threat and risk of climate change is going to lead to a collapse, and there is no stopping the defaunation (Sixth Mass Extinction) that defines our times as the Anthropocene. The title in a recent article in Science gives a succinct summary of one of the key problems: Hallmarks of science missing from North American wildlife management. This seems applicable to the recent professional reliance review. The science is missing and the current mass extinction is misunderstood in terms of scale and consequence for the people of BC and globally.

    An immediate call to action is required. Wildlife and habitat conservation must be turned into a top priority and not just the charismatic species, but all wildlife. Funding needs to be directed toward range-marginal environments enlisting the help and assistance of First Nations communities living in these areas. Investigations need to look into migration and range-shifts within high-latitude and northern range marginal areas. Amphibians are in decline globally more-so than other vertebrates, so they are likely to be a good indicator species. A northern research institute should be founded that opens a new department. We have the Department of Fisheries and Oceans – I see no reason not to initiate a Department of Amphibians and Reptiles, which would align with the science. The northern research institute should employ professional biologists working alongside scientists (PhD’s) dedicated to the task of understanding and mitigating the effects of climate change on wildlife and habitat and learning how we can adapt to rescue the next generation (a lifeboat for the province).

    The government needs to do a better job at informing the public on the scale of the problem and the nature of the threat that exists. Our children are going to be living in a very different world and have to contend with climate change extremes the likes of which we have never experienced. Wildlife and habitat are key to our survival. An action plan is needed to build a lifeboat for the next generation so that they may eek out an existence that might be worth living if it’s not already too late.

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    [-] Vicki

    This Habitat Conservation Society needs to be much more seriously funded by the Federal government. With so many issues facing conservation, they are desperately going to need more employees. Choose experienced responsible hunters. They understand and respect all aspects! Vicki from K Town

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    [-] Rob

    What challenges are we missing?
    The recent provincial election resulted in the grizzly bear hunt being terminated as a result of social pressures and special interest groups. Due to urbanization, society is becoming disconnected with wildlife and many individual’s perception of wildlife is what they learn through Disney or the Discovery channel. Science based wildlife management is the basis of sound wildlife practices and should continue to be. Government must also utilize their fiscal resources to educate the public on the need to manage wildlife based on scientific principals which includes sustainable, lawful, and ethical harvest of wildlife. It is important that the government dedicate additional financial resources for public outreach. The average British Columbian is losing sight of the realities of wildlife and that harvesting through hunting and trapping is not only sustainable but an effective management tool which provides essential funding for wildlife conservation. This message must be shared with the general public and resources must be used to achieve this means.

    What changes in wildlife/habitat management are most needed for BC (i.e., what are the highest priority challenges)?
    Funding – Dedicated funding from outdoor consumptive and non-consumptive users

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    [-] Emery

    The grizzly bear ban should never have happened. I have never seen so many grizzlies now that the ban is on. And they have got a lot more aggressive then in the past when they were hunted. People are going to die from grizzly bears this year.

    It’s up to us to manage wildlife, and this is not managing it.

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    [-] Chris

    BC’s wildlife is in trouble and at this rate the next generation may not have half the opportunity we have today.

    We need to be using the information derived from biologists, conservation officers, scientists and even the guides and hunters to make decisions about wildlife management. Unfortunately, the lower mainland seems to hold all the voices and can steer the direction of the entire province. The vast majority of those people dont know what’s actually happening out there. Their “opinion” is void on matters concerning the health of wildlife.

    Let’s get it together and not make irreversible mistakes.

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    [-] Mark

    Keep politics out of decisions the cancellation of the grizzly bear hunt was totally political keep politicians out of the decision making and let people that know about wildlife and habitat do there jobs

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    [-] Anthony

    – You missed something so important and the fact that you missed it shows that you’re possibly avoiding it. Logging, it’s effects on the environment, wildlife and habitat. Also to mention what the logging companies are replanting needs to be controlled to help diversify new forests.
    – Grizzly bear hunting and re-opening it.
    – More CO’s, increasing their wages and making it a place where it encourages new members of our society to get involved.

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    [-] Kent

    1) The fact that Government employee’s are not engaged in away with the general public.. My way or the highway mentality.
    2) Not much !
    3) Habitat improvement, Reduce predation ie Wolves & Bear’s ! Bring back the Grizzly Hunt…
    4) The way Government does business. Emotion before science, and the loss of common sense management !

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    [-] Kyle

    What challenges are we missing?
    – The recent provincial election resulted in the grizzly bear hunt being terminated as a result of social pressures and special interest groups. Due to urbanization, society is becoming disconnected with wildlife and many individual’s perception of wildlife is what they learn through Disney or the Discovery channel. Science based wildlife management is the basis of sound wildlife practices and should continue to be. Government must also utilize their fiscal resources to educate the public on the need to manage wildlife based on scientific principals which includes the lawful and ethical harvest of wildlife. It is important that the government dedicate additional financial resources for public outreach. The average British Columbian is losing sight of the realities of wildlife and that harvesting through hunting and trapping is not only sustainable but an effective management tool. This message must be shared with the general public and resources must be used to achieve this means.

    What changes in wildlife/habitat management are most needed for BC (highest priority)?
    – Adequate fiscal resources must be allocated to wildlife management in the province. By having the proper resources and mandate, wildlife managers can then make necessary decisions to ensure we have healthy and sustainable wildlife populations.
    – Having everyone informed and educated on the need for conservation including sustainable harvest is a must. With increased pressure from special interest groups sustainable harvest is being challenged and will have long term negative effects to wildlife management. Counter acting the negative pressure from anti-hunting organizations is an important step and the message must come from the government not hunter based conservation groups.

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    [-] Chad

    Nothing works well with wildlife management in BC. The province has failed on this one time and again. A complete overhaul is need and politics needs to be kept out of it. Ie: grizzly bears. The only species this province has somewhat of a handle on. The rest are in trouble.
    Simply put more money is need for better science so that manager can make informed desicions.

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    [-] Cheryl

    Speed limit changes better signage at night time

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    [-] Warren

    The Grizzly hunting ban was not a science based wildlife management decision. That decision was based on pressure from social/special interest groups which are not entirely comprised of BC residents.

    Now, without hunting pressure, Grizzly/human conflicts will increase, putting human lives in danger.

    There are not enough Conservation officers in most BC regions to adequate enforce fish/wildlife laws, and deal with human /animal conflicts. More funding is required to increase CO presence.

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    [-] Warren

    The LEH system in BC is in need of serious improvement. A priority point system used in many other jurisdictions, is what is needed for all LEH species. This would eliminate the situations of someone getting drawn several times for a species, while others have waited 10 plus years with no draw.
    Balance and fairness is what is required.

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    [-] Mandy

    1. Keep public opinions and emotions out of wildlife management.
    2. Do what is right for wildlife, not political gain.
    3. Manage predators, and encourage predator harvesting.
    4. Give more money directly back to fish and game, from the sale of licenses.
    5. Stop dividing citizens in this province by having no regulations or enforcement for one group of people and restricting everyone else, everyone needs to regulate their harvests.
    6. Enhance habitat with prescribed burns, stop spraying deciduous trees.
    7. Give CO’s more funding, hire more.
    8. Indigenous people need to report their harvests.

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    [-] Ken

    We live in BC because we love BC. But to live here, we must work here. We have something in this province that the rest of the world only wishes they had. But we are losing it at an alarming rate. A balance must be struck between sustaining our lifestyle and preserving our lifestyle. We must assign values to things beyond rocks and trees and must never allow an insatiable desire for natural resource extraction to trump what makes BC a super, natural place to live.

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    [-] Janet

    The last gov’t, the neoLiberals, dismissed so much of our natural environment, among a multitude of other things, that this gov’t is faced with a great deal to clean up. What can we do to help?

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    [-] Bronwen

    – It is important to protect and connect large tracts of intact forest to improve our environmental and economic future. Some opportunities include the southern Rockies, the Columbia headwaters around Revelstoke, and Hart ranges in the Peace.
    – Short-term economic decisions cannot outweigh the greater societal need of protecting clean water, intact wilderness and our special wildlife.
    – Bringing in best practices from other communities who have successfully learn to coexist with large wildlife could help us improve our province.

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    [-] Evelyn

    – It is important to protect and connect large tracts of intact forest to improve our environmental and economic future. Some opportunities include the southern Rockies, the Columbia headwaters around Revelstoke, and Hart ranges in the Peace.
    – Short-term economic decisions cannot outweigh the greater societal need of protecting clean water, intact wilderness and our special wildlife.
    – Bringing in best practices from other communities who have successfully learn to coexist with large wildlife could help us improve our province

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    [-] Adam

    Short-term economic or political decisions cannot outweigh the greater need of protecting clean water, intact wilderness and wildlife. Key opportunities for large new protected areas that can contribute to conservation and economic development or diversification include the headwaters of the Columbia, the southern Rockies, and the Wild Harts in northeast BC. Additionally, investigating best practices from other communities who are coexisting with large wildlife – particularly grizzlies – could help improve BC’s record in this respect. However anyone feels about the (partial) grizzly hunting ban, hunting bears is not the only way to live with grizzlies successfully.

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    [-] steve

    the guide industry has bought politicians and organizations for far too long to the detriment of resident hunters. like all other north American juristictions residents must come first and ONLY if there is enough for them. guiding has turned into welfare for the rich with animal allocations and has no bearing on the original concept of guiding. it is now like buying a store and having the taxpayer supply you with things to sell, primarily to other rich people. Hunting is not only for the rich

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    [-] Alex

    I am concerned about the practice of hiring conservation officers who are hunters. I am referring to the issue of the conservation officer who got into trouble because he saved some bear cubs when other officers wanted to use their guns. Good for him! Loving the outdoors is different from hunting. Please screen our conservation officers carefully. No more hunters. Conservation officers need to be people who care for our environment all the creatures who live in it.
    Educating local police forces about animals is really important. Compare the reaction to bears in North Van and bears in Abbotsford. In Abbotsford they just shoot the bear. Why???? In North Van they likely relocate the bear. It’s not the bears’ fault that they need to eat and humans have encroached on their area.
    As for deer and other creatures living in areas that are being taken over for houses, stop, stop, stop! City Councils need to stop accepting bribes (ie donations to election funds) from developers. It should be illegal for developers to donate to election funds. Stop developing wild areas. Leave them wild. Rather build high rises or encourage people to relocate to other areas. The rest of Canada is full of cheap properties.

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    [-] Kerri

    1. Better protection for wildlife and wildlife habitat is essential. BC has done a poor job to date protecting wildlife habitat

    2. Education, education, education is needed to address human-wildlife conflict issues. So many issues could be avoided, or easily resolved through educating the public (have seen the positive effects of wildlife education first hand)

    3. Ban all trophy hunting. Encourage bigger and better economic opportunities through wildlife (emphasis on life) tourism. Stop supporting guiding companies & their select clients killing the best of a species (and yes, they do take the best animals) to hang on someone’s wall. Shooting an animal from a mile away with a high tech scoped rifle is not “sport” or respectful “hunting.”

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    [-] Kath

    The leghold trap, designed and barely changed since the 18th century, is still used in trapping, although not exclusively anymore. Can we ban any and all trapping using this cruel device and seriously penalize those people who do not comply? Some trappers leave their prey caught for days in this trap, alive but injured, in a panic; we do not have the right to torture them this way.

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    [-] Mitch

    It seems more and more that the majority of BC’s population has little to no understanding of scientific wildlife management. Their understanding of wildlife comes from fictional movies (yes I mean you Walt Disney!) and possibly completely false social media campaigns. You don’t need to look further than the grizzly bear hunting decision last year, it was social pressure and social media campaigns that trumped our own wildlife professionals and studies. We shut down hunting, proven to be sustainable and to provide much needed funding, yet completely ignored the actual threats to bears laid out in the auditor generals report. To me this point to a huge need to educate the general public on wildlife management as well as sustainable use and harvest for personal consumption.
    As far as what’s working…… new funding allocations are a step in the right direction. Our Conservation officers are excellent as well as our biologists, let’s start listening to them!
    Changes in order of priority, FUNDING from increased user fees on all users of our wild places
    SCIENCE legislated objectives for populations, critical habitat, road densities, and regular monitoring to see we are actually meeting objectives.
    SOCIAL LICENCE form education, inclusive round table decision making.

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    [-] Frank

    predator control their is a huge increase in wolfs .wildlife management is not working in bc at all. if it was their won’t be a huge decrease in our sheep deer elk and caribou population
    habitat has to be managed for the wildlife’s best interest managing predators is one big concern but it can be done. road access power lines ect effect habitat. wintering grounds need to be protected.
    its time we start doing the right thing for our wildlife and where they live. not a political things because wildlife don’t care for politics it doesn’t put a roof over their heads.
    may we can form a wintering ground land reserve for wildlife much like the ALR for farm land

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    [-] Cullen

    Utilitizing science rather than emotion to make wildlife management decisions. Let scientists make the call rather than the uneducated public.

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    [-] Michael

    I think the LEH and tag system works well currently. I think more of the cost of these programs should go back into conservation and into further research of the species the tag/LEH was for and the ecosystem they are involved in. It would be great to have transparency on where the monies from licenses, tags, and LEHs goes currently and in the future.
    More conservation officers for research and reporting in the regions. I think there is a lack of conservation officers.
    PR campaign for CO service. I feel there is a negative connotation for seeing/dealing with them in BC. I ‘ve always seen the mindset that they are out to get you and they don’t help anyone. I’d like to see that mindset change. While hunting in Alberta, I’ve seen CO’s often in lots of WMU’s and been checked a couple times and they are always personable and I have even reached out to them for information or clarity.
    Wildlife and habitat management that is based upon science and not political gains.
    Last fall I was pleased t see that when I poacher was caught in my traditional territories the CO service had the animal donated to the elders in the area. I think that is taking a negative issue and doing the most positive you can with the situation.
    Indigenous hunting and fishing should be managed federally as that is where the Indian act is derived from not provincially. Greater clarity on rules would benefit everyone.

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    [-] Alex

    I believe that we need to change the BC LEH system on species such as Elk on the island. I think we could look at what certain states do in the US and have a point system so that somebody who puts in for elk every year and does not get the draw will accumulate points and get a better shot at a draw than somebody who has never entered before.

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    [-] Brycen

    What challenges? Communication.

    The voice of the few have overcome the thoughts of the many as demonstrated in the recent Grizzly bear ban. Prior to the ban there was a discussion process put in place for people to provide feedback regarding whether or not they supported a ban. This was not disseminated to the population by in large. By lack of communication the government perhaps received a skewed view of the British Columbian’s thought.

    Lack of communication is not specific to only the Grizzly bear ban. British Columbian’s need to be informed and engaged if any change is to take place. There needs to be a marked increase in engagement from the government with the people in this province if any of the issues identified in this forum are to be appropriately addressed.

    These discussions are a step in the right direction.

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    [-] Lisa

    As wildlife is diminishing, – shorten the hunting season – stop and have severe punishment for cruelty
    against all animals, pouching/trapping, etc.
    Increase the awareness and understanding of wildlife animals that they belong to no one except
    to themselves. They have feelings/ they have families/they have a hierarchy/ they are beautiful and
    wondrous creatures that deserve respect for what they were born to be – FREE!
    We need a Minister in the House of Parliament who will speak and protect animals and legislate new
    LAWS *for* the animals – not against them.

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    [-] Nick

    The largest challenge we face as British Columbians is being able to stand up to public pressure and ultimately do what’s sustainable for the animals and the environment. Allowing closure of sustainable hunts like the grizzly bear, or extraction of resources in sensitive caribou habitat is ridiculous. We need to stand up for what is right – not what’s the loudest. .

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    [-] Justin

    Grizzly ban was purely political not Fact based, if the government actually cared about our wildlife they would be putting more money towards conservation officers and stiffer penalties for those that want to poach, but instead they gave into disengaged city dwellers and placed an unneeded ban on grizzly hunts there’s many areas where these bears flourish and unchecked they calve a whole lot of ungulates every spring and we’ll be seeing a whole lot more human/bear conflicts in the near future.

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    [-] Ken

    Hunting is a vital part of wildlife management and information about the status of wildlife. No one is more committed to sustainability of wildlife than hunters and no other groups have done as much for wildlife sustainability. Often, hunting groups do the work that is needed for better habitat. Do not ignore this vital stakeholder in the process of consultation and decision making. And keep hunting rights open to all.

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    [-] Dave

    We need more science based data and that means some funding to collect it. I have tried to get information on grouse populations and there is very little. It is not a big ticket species, so it doesn’t get much attention. The pattern is repeated over and over. I am not saying our data on the big mammals is great, but there is a lot more of it. Over all, we are woefully short of real data, so all our discussions are poorly informed.

    If we really love the environment, put some money into understanding it so we can manage it well, either to preserve or use.

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    [-] Julien

    We should have a system where wildlife is managed by biologists and decisions are made without party affiliation or one-side ideologies. The grizzly bear ban happened without consulting wildlife biologists, hunters, or property owners who are affected and interact with grizzly bears.

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    [-] GREG

    GOOD EFFORT AT COVERING THE SCOPE OF THE ISSUE

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    [-] Andrew

    I would like to see how and what studies were done on the grizzly count was DNA taken was it a bait block with just cameras
    Are we sure there shrinking because of hunters we just had a terrible fire season with little growth last year and a very cold long winter

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    [-] David

    Wildlife and habitat do not acknowledge arbitrary boundaries and borders placed or created by humans.

    If you want a policy for BC then it needs to be consistant across the province – you can’t ahve different policies for hunting, fishing, resource extraction, data gathering, etc. if you consider every First Nation in BC a “nation” with complete control over what happens on their traditional territories – it must be a partnership that promotes sharing of information and joint management strategies.

    This also applies to our provincial and national neighbours – Alberta, the Yukon, Alaska, Washington, etc. there is no point in improving BC Caribou habitat if that same herd travels to the USA and there is no similar initiative in the relevant state (and the opposite applies from their viewpoint as well).

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    [-] Wayne

    I have had a long involvement in wildlife, governance and volunteerism with Fish and Wildlife issues and currently chair to organizations that work on either stream restoration or the recovery of a SARA list species. I was at one point the Chair of the Habitat and Sustainability files for the BC Wildlife Federation and very active in my local Vanderhoof Fish & Game Club.

    When asked for the solution to the current debacle we find our selves in …my first response to to ask the current Province Government to change one simple matrix that they have and that is the “free to grow” standard that they have in place that determines if the forest industry has meet its current legal obligations….and that then frees them up and their deposits can be returned to them. As this money has and is sometimes tied up for 15 plus years and they are at continued risk of failure from wildfires, insects etc.
    By changing this measurement, we then can consider wildlife needs and not the mono cultures that they currently target…..we eliminate the need for herbicides and or hake and squirt or brushing and we can have a healthy and diverse stocked forest…..like it was before the butchers arrived.

    The second most important issue would be to have land planning brought back that considers all values on the landscape.

    the third most important need is an oversight board….like the Forest Practices Board….but called the Natural Resource Practices Board….so we can understand causes and effects of all resource extraction and how watersheds, wildlife and fish are considered in the programs.

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    [-] Sharon

    Please stop killing animals such as bears and cougars a convenient and routine solution when these animals become a “nuisance”. Explore other creative ways to deal with the problem.
    Please allow orphaned bears and other animals to be rehabilitated, don’t kill them! We are encroaching on their territories, not the other way around. Have respect for nature and animals. They are not a resource to be managed, they are beautiful precious creatures who have as much of a right to live as we do.

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    [-] Sorelle

    • Policy can get in the way of progress. The abandoned pet rabbits have propagated because of provincial policy, not in spite of it. Rescue groups were not allowed to pick them up when they were first abandoned.
    • The government of the day expected people to trap and destroy the rabbits, which of course wasn’t going to happen, and proper research would have determined that outcome.
    • The rabbits are still mired in policy. A recent change allowed shelters and rescues to trap and possess the rabbits but at press time, permits were required to adopt out or transfer the rabbits.
    • All city shelters and most rescues are designed as clearing houses, the rabbits need to leave the shelter or rescue and thus must face substantial and often insurmountable permitting challenges.

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    [-] Adam

    You need todo something about the deer population! In Victoria and salt spring island! You can’t drive down the road without hitting 6 of them these days!

    Next issue, relocate animals instead of just shooting them! If they aren’t hurting anyone!

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    [-] Warren

    Provincial government need to employ more wildlife biologists and ecologists so that they can be involved in all aspects of development and industry within BC.

    The North American Model of Wildlife Conservation needs to be the cornerstone of wildlife policy in BC.

    To build wildlife management policy off of public opinion and well funded special interest groups is not in the best interest of future generations who deserve the opportunity to hunt and fish in a quality backcountry environment.

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    [-] Gail

    My comment was quoting John E. Marriott who stated succinctly and sufficiently wise advise on this subject of wildlife. I want my opinions and voice to be heard and could not have said it better than him And his followers! Thank you

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    [-] Chris

    The importance of securing critical wildlife habitat in BC in an era ever increasing developing, fragmentation and stresses from cumulative effects is essential if wildlife populations are to be sustained.

    In previous decades, the Province was much more active in purchasing private land that had high biodiversity and wildlife habitat values (i.e. UWR, wetlands), particularly in valley bottoms. Once secured, these properties became part of the Province’s Conservation Lands portfolio. While there are many non-profits operating in BC as land trusts that do this very type of work, it would not hurt to have the Provincial Government put a renewed focus on this important activity.

    Furthermore, the Conservation Lands that the Province currently have are not well resourced with staff time or annual budgets. This needs to change, so that they can fully achieve the goals and objectives they were set aside for – as wildlife resource multipliers.

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    [-] Mark

    The challenge comes in the form of implementation. Most of the solutions (or direction towards a solution) are listed in the opportunities section under each of the challenges. Most will challenge the status quo and therefore we hope that these consultation initiatives are not simply a way to delay and defer actions that need to be taken.?.

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    [-] Martin

    FUNDING!!!

    Would like to see 100% of tags and licenses to go towards the conservation of wildlife and wild places. Funds being used for science should tell use what is needed. Would like to see science based conservation for the betterment and management of BCs wildlife.

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    [-] Martin

    A wildlife Charter that directs wildlife & habitat conservation with a directive to be done in scientific management not just by what people want emotionally or otherwise.

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    [-] Darlene

    Absolutely NO wolf culls. Our caribou have declined because of habitat loss due to industry and recreational use of ATVs, not because of wolves. Helicopter, snares, traps, poisoning are all cruel methods of culling, killing other wildlife besides wolves.. If the deer population is causing problems in urban areas, a cull where the deer meat can be used should be instituted. Increase the quota for hunters as well. I think we have no business culling any type of wildlife unless there is an imminent danger to humans. Mankind causes all the problems for example all the plastic found in sea life. We are making species extinct.

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    [-] Leeanne

    Let’s try to let predators manage their own units. It’s been proven over and over again they can and do when undisturbed by humans in their natural habitats

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    [-] Scott

    Wildlife First: To have healthy wildlife populations we need to have healthy ecosystems. Decision-makers need to put a value on wildlife and the habitat they depend upon.
    • Management plans should be created with population objective for all species.
    • Population objectives need to be based upon habitat capability
    • The management scale should be at a landscape-level
    • Management decision should be based on science
    • Wildlife managers should have more authority to use all management “tools” to manage wildlife and achieve the population objectives
    • Proactive management is less expensive than recovery management
    • Wildlife must have a value
    • Review resource activities and statutes that have an adverse impact to wildlife and their habitat i.e. free growing

    Value: Our biggest concern is that, currently, wildlife has no value. It is not considered in land-use decisions, and without a value on wildlife, there is no consideration for its habitat in resource-extraction decisions.

    Accountability and Empowerment: Wildlife managers (SDMs) must have performance measures with habitat and population objectives to manage to. So too they need more authority over habitat and land use. Once goals have been legally established by statutory decision makers, wildlife SDMs can then be held accountable in relation to the achievement of those objectives.

    Education: The public needs to understand that animals are not cute and cuddly Disney characters. Government has an obligation to legitimize hunting as a viable – and sustainable – food source, and to demonstrate that hunting plays an important role in wildlife management.

    Primary Prey: GOABC is alarmed by the suggestion that primary prey theory be expanded as a method of addressing declining populations. We are adamantly opposed to this impractical and dangerous approach. We see primary prey theory as a passive and simplistic approach that does not address the immediacy of the predator problem nor the complex predator-prey relationship. It is a pilot project at best, still lacking adequate evidence that it works.
    Predator control MUST be something we do – if we do not, wildlife will pay the ultimate price. We need clearly defined population objectives for all species. When we observe an imbalance in the predator/prey dynamic, we must then take the appropriate action. Predator control is a critical – and perhaps the most critical – component of moose recovery. To this end, predator control should be used proactively and consistently until both predator and prey numbers are within the desired population density.

    We recognize that culling predators is an emotionally-charged issue. However, we must set our fickle emotions aside and adhere to science-based principles and do what is best for wildlife. As stewards of this majestic resource, we must not allow emotional social responses to trump science and prevent the appropriate management of our wilderness.

    The caribou maternal penning program costed roughly $350,00 per year over 15 years to realize an increase of seven caribou. SEVEN?!? Are the costs of this program even coming close to the population gains being achieved? Unless we are going to fence off all of British Columbia, maternal caribou penning is impractical. Are we investing vast resources simply to delay the inevitable? If we’re only serving to make the predator’s next meal a bit larger, more filling and less instinctually-capable of escape, what have we gained? Sounds more like a predator feeding program than a prey recovery program.

    Citizen Science: Outfitters take a long-term approach to wildlife management and often have thousands of hours on the ground with significant local knowledge. This is mainly because outfitters have defined boundaries and cannot move. Similarly, First Nations have traditional territories and take a 7-generations perspective to wildlife management. Local knowledge and First Nations traditional knowledge must be incorporated into population models to improve accuracy.
    • Local community-based input is crucial
    • Inclusion of local and traditional knowledge
    • Need a balance of all species across the landscape i.e. all predator and prey
    • Develop wildlife populations for predator and prey species, based on habitat capability
    • Objectives need to be created so everyone understands what we are managing to

    Outfitting Legislation: All regulations surround outfitting in British Columbia help to ensure lawful hunting and improve public safety. There is opportunity to make improvements in legislation to increase business certainty and investor confidence. This would enhance economic development and increase wildlife stewardship. Improved outfitter legislation would include:
    • Professional reliance and self-regulation
    • Modernize licence issuance
    • Legislation to improve bankability
    • Reduce “red-tape”

    These changes will create more jobs and more wildlife. This could be delivered through a DAO model.

    Delegated Administrative Organization: The establishment of a Delegated Administrative Organization (DAO) in the outfitting sector would be a valuable concept worth exploration. A DAO would increase accountability structure and lead to a higher level of professionalism in the industry, increased public safety and consumer confidence, and increased conservation. All things that would be good for wildlife and British Columbians alike.

    While the DAO would be responsible for the delivery of the program, the provincial government would retain control over standards, legislation, regulations and policy, and how they are enforced.
    The main advantages of a DAO are:
    • empower groups or industry sectors to regulate themselves and resolve their own problems; and
    • reduce the cost to government of enforcing current legislation.

    The creation of a delegated authority would make guiding a registered profession, similar to realtors, insurance professionals, massage therapists, etc. The mandate would be to protect the public and environment by ensuring that outfitters and guides act ethically, with integrity and competence.

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    [-] John

    There is many aspects to this issue,the dynamics of people as well as many aspects to wildlife management, so it has been difficult to articulate all my ideas adequate.
    One aspect which received little attention was private land ownership which is veryidversified, from ranch/farm to tree farms /wood lots to acreages./orchards Some of these properties make allowance for wildlife whereas others show no regard for wildlife. Ther needs to be some incentive for them to participate in wildlife management.
    The wheel does not need to be reinvested, the North American Model of Wildlife Management works in many jurisdictions, it just needs the funding and staffing to make it work in BC which has the potential greatest diversity if wildlife in North America. This needs to be the highest priority.

    Politics needs to be kept out of the mix, and management assigned to a separate agency similar to the Freshwater Fisheries Society.

    There needs to be inclusion of various user groups, FN , guides/outfitters, trappers, hunters, etc., in an advisory board to the independent management board. Their input would be considered along with scientific knowledge from studies of conducted by objective biologists.

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    [-] Elizabeth

    I came across a deer feeding beside a busy road in the middle of the day yesterday. I was concerned for it’s safety and called the conservation office. They advised that they do not herd animals and if it is a safety concern to call the RCMP. In other words, once the deer has been hit by a car and someone’s car is damaged or someone is hurt or the deer is died or injured is the only time anything will be done. This concerns me.

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    [-] Warren

    I would be interested to know how many comments were not approved after they were submitted. I made submissions to the first two questions and were not approved as they don’t show up on the list. My comments had valid points and in no way could be taken as offensive. I would like to know the process of approving the submitted comments and what checks and balances were put in place to ensure fair representation of all points of view. I’m feeling that this very process of engagement may need more transparency to hold the confidence of its users.

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