Labour Relations Code Review – Results



Engagement Summary

A panel of three special advisors is independently reviewing British Columbia’s Labour Relations Code to ensure British Columbians have the same rights and protections enjoyed by other Canadians and that workplaces support a growing sustainable economy, with fair laws for workers and businesses. The Panel will also assess issues from the perspectives of promoting certainty as well as harmonious and stable labour relations.
 
The Labour Relations Code establishes the relationships between labour and management – how workers join unions, how employers and unions interact, and how collective bargaining disputes are resolved. The last comprehensive reviews of the code took place in 1992 and 2003. The last amendments to the Code were in 2002.
 
The Panel initiated an extensive public consultation process by inviting written submissions, which have been posted online here. Individuals and organizations were invited to present their views in greater detail at one of 10 regional meetings around B.C. Further dialogue was then gathered through reply submissions, where individuals or organizations could comment on other submissions or provide further feedback.
 

Timeframe: 

February 19 – April 24, 2018
 

Input received:
  • 83 presentations were made at ten regional meetings held in 9 locations throughout B.C. including: Victoria, Courtenay, Prince George, Kelowna, Kamloops, Cranbrook, Terrace, Surrey and Vancouver (two meetings were held)
  • 79 submissions, 19 replies (representing 26 organizations) and 93 emails were received

 

Input leads to action:

The Panel is currently reviewing the written and oral submissions received and considering legal developments, Canadian labour legislation, reports and studies. Deliberations will commence in the near future. The Panel will provide a report to the Minister of Labour by August 2018 outlining its processes, observations, and any recommendations for amendments or updates to the Labour Relations Code it determines are necessary to achieve its mandate.