Discussion 6: What education and training will help your community prepare for future climate changes?



The Province is doing critical work through CleanBC to reduce our emissions and take action on climate change. But greenhouse gas emissions already in the atmosphere will continue to cause changes over the coming decades. Preparing for climate change is about understanding these changes and developing appropriate measures to respond and be prepared. It’s what we call being “climate-ready”.
 
Education and training are essential tools for building awareness, shared understanding, knowledge, skills and increased capacity to respond to a changing climate reality. Education and training enable informed decision-making, and are also essential components of building a climate-ready workforce that can effectively engage with both the challenges and opportunities presented by climate change.

Question 6: What education and training will help your community and others understand and prepare for future climate changes?

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20 responses to “Discussion 6: What education and training will help your community prepare for future climate changes?

    User avatar
    [-] Rob

    While there is a wonderful depth in our communities in BC of education — IESVic, PICS, Camosun’s Sustainability program are just three I’m involved in — and resources, there is also plentiful need for preparing communities to move out of mindsets that will harm us all.

    The idea that dumping any waste, whether harmful pollutants that are directly toxic (or mutagenic or teratogenic), or harmful activators (hormones, GHGs, etc.) is acceptable has to be rooted out, exposed, revealed for how wrong it is and made as unacceptable now as once it was in any community.

    There’s a difference between safe waste disposal, and unsafe; between sanitary and insane. Just as the case of maintaining hygiene by keeping microbes and things that might nourish them apart, or maintaining fire safety by keeping fuel from spark, simple notions that don’t take much education but do need deep hold in all our minds in the community, so too do we need the notion that fossil fumes don’t belong in air to become.

    We need to disabuse ourselves of the notion that carbon tax is anything but fire sale prices on fossil waste disposal, if it is pegged lower than the cost to suppliers of having that wasted dumped on us. And we know that price is in the many hundreds of dollars a tonne, so anything lower than that just encourages too much dumping.

    We need to remember how the Montreal Protocol worked, how stopping lead poisoning worked, how stopping thalidomide birth defects worked: bans, transitions, plans that actually stopped distribution and use. And we need to do those.

    We need to teach, and learn, the urgency, that if we do not end fossil emissions by 2030, then in later decades the dominos that fall will knock out whole species, perhaps most life.

    And we need to talk about those topics, not topics like pipelines or growing trade in fossil or capturing carbon while increasing fossil extraction, or how some future generation might adapt.

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    [-] Julia

    There is conflicting messages about climate change when news reports are followed with ads to buy cars and spend money on things we dont need. And we hear bad news about places such as the melting arctic ice but no indepth discussion about what it means for our lives. Education needs to be done at all levels of govt, business and schools. it should be mandatory training/information for all ages.

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    [-] Mike

    I will not vote for candidates that don’t make clear what their views on climate adaptation are and how the policies they support will be effective and are affordable at the level of government they represent.
    I will vigorouly oppose politicians and bureaucrats that advocate for government funding to offset environmental impacts that could readily be forseen and prevented (building in flood-risk areas, building in slide prone areas, building in the middle of a forest with no buffer zone, etc.) Our limited tax dollars must be used for protecting and improving, not for paying for preventable mistakes.
    I helped opposed the building of a new divided highway in my rural neighbourhood which is in the middle of nowhere but connects to another town which is growing exponentially as a bedroom community for the big city. We weren’t successful (it will get our MLA re-elected) but we need to resist uncontrolled and unsustainable development in rural areas at every opportunity. I will campaign for another candidate next election.
    I have invested in infrastructure improvements on my land to mitigate the upstream impacts of rapacious and ill-considered development. Where permits were too difficult to obtain from government (riparian area) I just went ahead anyway but tried to be discrete.
    I cooperated with neighbours to develop a local wild fire response plan including purchasing equipment, helping to cut back bush around structures, cutting down and removing dead trees regardless if permits could be obtained.
    As a consequence of engaging with neighbours in a cooperative manner our local quality of life has generally improved (except for the new highway) and we are more confident that collectively we are much better prepared to help each other face risks associated with natural events.
    There is a big opportunity for our local leaders to start demonstrating leadership on matters within their mandate. We do not have any local garbage management. All waste and recycling we produce is shipped out of the community. Same holds true for compostable waste. It’s a problem of our own making and we should deal with it.
    Council is still approving new permits for drive through food outlets. All day long, cars and trucks idle in line for several minutes for a cup of coffee. There are better solutions.
    We have great big diesel buses driving around empty most of the day. Then they go back to the city “out of service”. We need a smaller, efficient, local solution to public transit that is expandable should demand expand in future.
    We continue to cut down all the trees in our town centre for more development.
    All the runoff water from new development is directed towards the drains to the ocean.
    Seems like “green is good” but just for everybody else. Must make our elected representatives accountable and responsible for local decisions (and inaction).

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    [-] Elena

    Education about climate friendly food!

    As many people feel hopeless and don’t know how to start and take action in reducing their greenhouse emission curve, food choices are a first good step to a more climate friendlier life.

    Everybody is doing it every day several times: Deciding what to eat. Education about climate friendly food is crucial at this point. Many people are thinking they have to go vegan to make an effect on the greenhouse gas emission curve. However, if they swab out their beef and lamp meat to poultry and pork products and adding more plant-based meals during their week is already a good start.

    People need a climate friendly food guide! Start having food and cooking classes in schools, bring school classes to groceries stores and show them where they can find the climate friendly food choices, grow veggies with children, make climate-friendly food choice labels, etc

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    [-] Mike

    Re: Local education and training?
    I suppose we might start with learning how to quantify the environmental impacts of local activities with a view to requiring us to face up to our own actions. It’s easy to pontificate about things everybody else should be doing but when it’s time to look in the mirror, the message hits a little too close to home.
    We listen to rants about the oilsands and then sit in an idling truck or car waiting at one of the many drive throughs for a cup of coffee. Get out of your vehicle. Better yet, buy a coffee maker and reuse your mug.
    We listen to the public gripes about inadequate public (and heavily sunsidised) public transportation but the big diesel buses drive around all day virtually empty and then drive back to the city at the end of the day “out of service”. A free taxi service would be more cost effective in our rural community. Use an EV taxi and it would provide local employment and be zero emmision too.
    We spend millions of dollars building bike lanes to vehicle standards that are used by only a handful of people (only in the summer or fair weather) ,when it would be far more efficient to just give away bus passes and use the massive amounts of funds on something efficient. Spare me the spandex-clad virtue signalling and get on a bus. There is no payback on bike lanes in a rural area. This is a “dime chasing a dollar”.
    Our locally generated garbage and recycling materials are shipped out of the community by truck. We have no local composting facility. It’s our waste; we should be required to deal with it ourselves.
    We took land out of ALR and covered it wih astroturf. I suppose that is still ” green”.
    We are steadily cutting down stands of trees and clearing lots in the middle of town to make room for dense housing. Lots of new government money available for low income housing so cut the trees and sign us up.
    My community is not preparing to adapt. We are only talking about how to “save the planet”. We declared a “climate emergency” and haven’t taken one significant step to mitigate our local impacts. If anything, development has increased significantly and the rate of damage and unsustainable growth we are causing is increasing.
    As an election sop our MLA is getting an expensive new highway built through his riding and our rural community ostensibly “for safety”. The politicians aren’t kidding anybody. This is a high speed commuter route to expand the bedroom community next to the big city (and their voting base). If you can believe it, the plan is to reduce the number of bus stops. One traffic light and a little speed enforcement would have had far more impact on safety at far less cost. The daily commute would however have been slower. Sucks to live in the countryside and work in the big city.
    In summary: I believe we will start to take responsible actions when we are forced to realise how we are individually and collectively responsible at the local level for the impacts we are directly contributing to. What is my environmental footprint? What is my community’s environmental footprint? Should I be concerned or is it somebody else’s problem? If we don’t realise we are part of the problem we’ll continue to preach vaingloriously about things that everybody else should be doing when there are practical things we can be doing right here, right now.
    If government is looking for an expanded role in future climate change it might start with putting some of the responsibilty back down to the local level to encourage everyone to clean up their own back yard. “Think global – act local.”
    I am encouraged that the question posed implies that we also need to prepare to adapt to climate change and not just pray that it doesn’t occur. Voters could pose the question to their elected representatives: “what are the potential impacts to our community and what are the plans to adapt to these changes”. I’ll bet my community responds with something along the lines of: “we are going to focus our energies on fighting climate change” raher than admit there’s a need to also plan to adapt.

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    [-] Carlin

    people show up to fridays for future, they park their car 4 blocks away and walk there so they don’t look bad

    ^our biggest problem^ Hippocrates.

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    [-] Gary

    BC needs to develop a training plan to grow more food locally. For the past several years Leda Farm has been offering gardeners and farmers training in making Biodynamic Compost. Biodynamic Agriculture has over 95 years of world-wide experience in humus based food production. About 20 people per year attend our workshops. It would be better if we had financial support to expand this program specifically targeting younger potential gardeners and farmers.

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    [-] Jesse

    I wonder if getting more people to know about specific toolkits could help:
    * Project Drawdown
    * 6 foundations of community resilience
    * planetary boundaries
    * doughnut economics
    * steady-state economics
    * modern monetary theory and Positive Money

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    [-] Robert

    My community has an incredible wealth of people with extensive backgrounds in climate change, resiliency, economic and ecological systems, business, etc., so training and education is not our primary need. What will be needed as we move forward is resources for planning, modeling, enhancement of emergency response capacity, and adaptive management of our ecosystems. This is true province-wide, and the total bill to move our communities an ecosystems to a more resilient path will be many billions of dollars. We need to begin making these investments now, and we need to focus on minimizing the costs by mobilizing the talents present in every community to make this happen efficiently.

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    [-] Concerned

    People need to understand they can get out of their vehicles. They need to be trained at a earlier age to ride bicycles and walk and to take public transit. However, if there isn’t safe places to be active then they will not get out of their vehicles. This needs to happen throughout British Columbia, not just in densely populated areas. People visiting the Province should be able to use public transit that is RUN by the government in order to get around. Not rent a car in order to visit this province.

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    [-] Carlin

    To often do i see a lonely man in a pickup truck with and not hauling anything, these types of men are typically the most angry because most of them spent more on their trucks then their family or home.
    its sad but i once known a man who spent over 50000$ in upgrades and lift kits while their Girlfriend works 2 jobs to pay for the home and family.

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    [-] sue

    All things food security, energy conservation and alternate energy production, water conservation

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    [-] Mitch

    I think that we need to mitigate environmental and economic concerns without a pejorative tone. I think an emphasis on decarbonization is extremely important but the language we use to describe it needs to be phrased more in terms of opportunities than threats. For example, it’s not particularly helpful to remind someone that they’re chronically obese, but educating an obese person on how regular exercise creates an regime of myokine protein synthesis which has positive antidepressant effects and may stimulate libido sounds more tenable than calling someone fat. Same goes with climate change.

    If we can educate people on the meaning of energy cogeneration, describe and provide tools for students to learn about emerging technologies like gold nano particle based artificial photosynthesis for atmospheric carbon dioxide capture to synthesize methalane(?) , it creates a better understanding of why we may need a carbon tax to assist in affording tools and technologies before they’re commercially viable. If we don’t have actionable outcomes and meaningful milestones prepared- and communicated through ongoing youth and adult education- then I worry it will be more of the same uninspiring political gridlock.

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    [-] Tara

    I would like to see climate change and climate-related topics pushed across all levels of the BC education system, as we did recently with indigenous education topics. Most students still do not have a fulsome understanding of anthropomorphic climate change and many still don’t believe it is real. They don’t understand even how CO2 is central. They mostly get their education on climate topics from social media.
    We also need to help them to find ways to move forward with hope and not despair or apathy.

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    [-] Carlin

    Heyo My grandmother and i made a terrarium together and with a 5th grade scientific understanding
    i Knew for a matter of fact if i pulled hydrocarbons from below and burn them the terrarium
    ecosystem would not be able to cope with the extra Co2 the terrarium would mostly die leaving only single cells, plants and bacteria to thrive.
    Earth is a terrarium.

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    [-] Carlin

    Ok….. these questions seen to revolve around one thing and its not getting off oil
    it seams the government wants suggestions to deal with climate change rather than the front line we can join to stop it.

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    [-] David

    All the previous questions and categories of reference come down to the foundation of education. Most people ignore or reject climate science, if they have the capacity to understand it all.

    Education has served business, industry, and government but not to adjust to the climate crisis. Trained to entertain themselves and perpetuate BAU, most people pursue transitory pleasure, not deep adaptation (prime example: Don Cherry voted as Canada’s second most important person; who remembers the first?). We have a crisis of consciousness, an existential bad faith that is catastrophic and likely irremediable without direct, immediate threat.

    Governance double-deals, pretending to recognize the crisis with initiatives such as “ClimateReady” but continuing fossil-fuel initiatives, from subsidies to pipelines. Radical infrastructure change is low priority, and resources are squandered to satiate the oblivious. Electrification of everything only raises the problem of supply and further crises of provision and environmental compromise.

    Social and political revolution is our future. By the end of the century, strife over climate will dominate. Millions will die, in famine and in war over the last best places to live. America will take over Canada, as did Nazi Germany Europe, for “living space”. Governance will at most serve what remaining private interests can pay for it.

    All indicators I know point to collapse. All that is left is angry and nihilistic direct action. As crises mount, watch for attacks on fossil fuel infrastructure and supportive business and government.

    The best education then will be how to attack and survive.

    .

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    [-] mitchel

    i think education to convince people that climate change is actually happening is the most important!!

    once that’s complete, i think we need to educate people on new sustainable energy options and ways we all need to cut back and conserve (reduce, re-use, recycle)

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    [-] Putu

    Along with climate adaptation training that is practical (regenerative agriculture, water stewardship, reforesting/food forestry, riparian area rehabilitation, eco-technologies, alternative transportation etc.), I believe that we need education for communities and individuals on the emotional, spiritual and relational ways we can move through the discomfort that climate change is bringing in a peaceful and connected way. At the same time as ecological and economic climate impacts are increasing, so are mental health issues, homelessness, divisive politics, isolation, hate crimes and more. Looking at historical catastrophic periods of human history we know that fear and insecurity breeds violence and aggression. I believe we need educational opportunities at all levels (children, adults, across cultures) that helps us learn to navigate the suffering and challenges that lie ahead – this can include non-violent communication, Work that Reconnects (also known as despair work, see Joanna Macy), trauma-informed practice training, land-based healing, decolonization and reconciliation work and more.

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    [-] Ruth

    It would be nice to see governments at all levels being proactive in redesigning both policies and actual landscapes to be more resilient in the face of climate change, as well as disseminating information about disaster response as a strategy. There are many ways that public parks, facilities and open spaces can become part of a resiliency strategy, to help deal with increasingly severe storm events, watershed degradation and increased sea levels. Engineering departments in urban areas could be employing some of these strategies rather than only relying on built infrastructure to save the day. Innovation is the key.

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