Discussion 4: What supports will you need as impacts from climate change increase?



 
The Province is doing critical work through CleanBC to reduce our emissions and take action on climate change. But greenhouse gas emissions already in the atmosphere will continue to cause changes over the coming decades. Preparing for climate change is about understanding these changes and developing appropriate measures to respond and be prepared. It’s what we call being “climate-ready”. Climate change affects our homes, jobs, health, and even our mental wellbeing. We will need to come together and support one another as we experience more and more impacts of climate change.

Dr. Shannon Waters, Medical Health Officer

 

People need a wide range of resources to cope with these changes, both in an emergency and from day-to-day. We want to know what kind of supports are currently available, and how they might need to change going forward.

Question 4: What community groups and organizations do you turn to or get support from in times of change or stress? What type of supports do you receive from these organizations? How would these supports need to change given the increased risk of wildfires, heatwaves, droughts and floods?

Share photos of the changes you are seeing on social media and tag #ClimateReadyBC and #MyClimateStoryBC

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13 responses to “Discussion 4: What supports will you need as impacts from climate change increase?

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    [-] Rob

    I need whatever support it takes to transition from fossil fully by 2030 in every fossil-emitting area, domestic and in trade, personal and community.

    I need sheriffs to padlock pumps, and supports for gas station workers moving to the work that will be needed in an eV-biogas-power2gas economy.

    I need courts and legislators to treat this issue as a must that gets done by 2030, because the odds according to science become very grim thereafter, and I do not want to be remembered as someone who stood by and let a few do so much damage to the legacy handed into my hands.

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    [-] Julia

    i have been part of a group that met regularly to talk about the emotional impact of climate change and this was helpful in terms of not falling into despair. I seek out opportunities to have this conversation within my friendship network to ensure myself and others dont feel isolated in our feelings about the future.
    i think social services is going to need to prepare for clients experiencing increased stress, fear, despair related to climate change. And reconsider the type of supports families will need.

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    [-] Carlin

    Heya in my attempt to avoid fossil fuels, i have no friends, no real connection to family, no girlfriend, no car. My brain is damaged, and my body is deteriorating, i’m loosing weight (BMI of 17.0) and dropping
    depression so deep it not even depression anymore, every time i hear a loud vehicle my heart wrenches in Anger. if i didn’t meditate i’m sure i would not be alive right now

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    [-] Mike

    I reflect on the challenges my ancestors (both native and immigrant) faced only a few generations ago. I give thanks for the great opportunities and comforts we have today and how much less stress, and hardship we face. When someone tells me about how stressed they’re feeling about the world today I offer them a Kleenex. We have such an abundance of comfort and opportunity and we should make every effort to use this to improve our lives for ourselves, our children, and our community. This also implies responsible stewardship to ensure the progress we’ve made as a society isn’t wasted by destruction or waste and we live our lives as though we are always sowing the seeds for the success of future generations. If some feel a need to develop some mental robustness and fortitude there are no shortages of opportunites to volunteer in the community to make a tangible difference to the lives of those around us less fortunate. My grandparents would be ashamed if they heard me saying I need a safe space, shoulder to cry on, or someone to hold my hand. They’d tell me to get off my butt, take some presonal responsibility, and do something about it.
    Spoke with the local fire chief about the drier summers we are experiencing, reduced water supplies and risk of wild fires in our rural community. He gave useful advice about how our neighbourhood could organise ourselves to improve resiliency. The real challenge is that unlike a few decades ago neighbours barely even know each other by name let alone say hello. Unlike my ancestors that understood the value in working together as a comunity to address shared risk and hardship many of my neighbours live in their own little bubble but at the same time don’t hesitate to cry their hearts out on Fbook. So a few of us have organised ourselves, work together and are adapting to changing conditions. This has already proven to be very beneficial for those that participate. Should something happen we know we can rely on each other. For everybody else: well I guess there’s an app for that.

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    [-] Dean

    I use various strategies to help our clients/families and staff to learn to emotionally self regulate. EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique) Tapping was cleared through our best practise leaders in Victoria in 2016. I received a Wellness grant in 2017 to teach this and HeartMath technology to staff in our building. I have been teaching/using these tools through our Health and Wellness department. Recently that program has been shut down. I continue to support clients/families and staff one on one. The transformations I have witnessed time and time again continue to astound me. I am humbled to be in the presence of someone who experiences the healing that occurs when these tools are used. I would be interested in spreading what I know to a wider audience. When it comes to “…facilitate more cohesive and consistent planning and delivery of psychosocial recovery efforts after a natural disaster” as you mentioned above, the video here https://www.tappingsolutionfoundation.org/
    will provide a short 4 minute overview of how EFT is changing lives.

    This quick video meditation will lead through an experience of the tool in action…check it out!
    http://www.thetappingsolution.com/tws-videos/tapping-meditation-releasing-stress.php

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    [-] Brian

    – Consulting with professionals in times of stress costs money. That excludes many people.
    – We need community events for the public to attend as well as pamphlets and online information.
    – At times of increased risk or consequence in a community (eg forest fire) teams of professionals need to spend time to assist public/community people respond to situation

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    [-] Ruth

    Close fish farms sooner than planned ! PLEASE

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    [-] Bryan

    Speaking as a community member involved in drafting Salt Spring Islands 2030/2050 Climate Action Plan, there needs to be tools for communities to aggressively address mitigation and adaptation. There needs to be funding to support the development of climate plans for communities that go beyond municipal facilities and fleets. There needs to be funding for community group and First Nations to lead. Data access is another pressing issue. It is very hard to access, for example, gas tax data. There needs to be a data portal for such data to make developing community plans easy, and the province could be a hub for sharing best practices and convening community leaders who are trying to mitigate GHGs and prepare their communities for the coming changes. On a more localized note, there needs to be infrastructure funding to safeguard our forests (through swale based water collection, etc) to funding for roads that are vulnerable to king tides and rising sea levels.

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    [-] Concerned

    How can this type of public policy be good for mental health? This is what makes people feel powerless and why you have so few respondents to this exercise. People think their opinion doesn’t count.

    Craziness – https://thenarwhal.ca/clean-b-c-is-quietly-using-coal-and-gas-power-from-out-of-province-heres-why/

    The majority of people in the Province think that old growth logging needs to stop too, but it is still continuing…

    https://www.ancientforestalliance.org/bcts-non-compliance-nahmint-valley/

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    [-] sue

    Any agency, ministry, group offering mental health supports including therapy, cultural healing circles and rituals, mindfulness and meditation, physical activities, social connection

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    [-] Carlin

    So… no one is talking to British petrol and Exxon etc…about this, they are accountable, but absolutely no one is talking about Who put us in this situation. wow

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    [-] mitchel

    the government will need much larger reserves to help people affected by natural disasters (fires, floods, etc)

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    [-] Michael

    It’s pretty simple;

    1) TELL THE TRUTH – Government must tell the truth by declaring a climate and ecological emergency, working with other institutions to communicate the urgency for change.

    2) STOP THE DESTRUCTION – Government must act now to halt biodiversity loss and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2025.

    3) LISTEN TO THE PEOPLE – Government must create, and be led by, the decisions of a Citizens’ Assembly on climate and ecological justice.

    Most people can easily think of ways to accomplish what is necessary. Just ask child – any child can tell you in simple terms what needs to be done. Educate people about the facts, then let them decide what will be done.

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