Columbia River Treaty News

October 7, 2022

Latest round of negotiations to modernize the Columbia River Treaty leads towards finding common ground on key issues

The 14th round of negotiations towards a modernized Columbia River Treaty took place Oct. 4 and 5 in Spokane, Washington. Katrine Conroy, Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, issued a statement reflecting on the progress made towards finding common ground on ecosystem co-operation, increased flexibility for operation of Canadian Treaty dams, hydropower coordination, and flood-risk management. Read her statement at the link below.

Following the negotiations, Global Affairs Canada and the U.S. Department of State hosted a binational workshop on Columbia River ecosystems and Indigenous and Tribal cultural values. Members from the U.S. and Canadian negotiating teams came together with representatives of Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations, Columbia Basin Tribes in the U.S., and government agencies to share information and inform future discussions on how co-ordination on these issues can be improved to benefit ecosystems on both sides of the border.

Read the Minister’s full statement for more details: https://news.gov.bc.ca/27581

 

August 15, 2022

Progress continues towards a modernized Columbia River Treaty

Katrine Conroy, Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, issued a statement today following the 13th round of Canada-U.S. negotiations to modernize the Treaty, which took place on August 10 and 11. Over the two days, negotiators met to review proposals developed by each country.

“The aim of each proposal is to find agreement on an updated Treaty framework that includes not only flood-risk management and hydropower co-ordination, but also co-operation on ecosystems and increased flexibility for Canadian operations,” Minister Conroy explained. “The additional flexibility would enable Canada to meet domestic objectives including for Indigenous cultural values and socio-economic interests.”

The negotiating teams exchanged initial proposals in 2020. At an informal meeting earlier this year, the U.S. team presented Canada with their second proposal and the Canadian team, which includes representatives from Canada, B.C. and the Ktunaxa, Secwepemc and Syilx Okanagan Nations, responded with their second proposal last week.

Read Minister Conroy’s full statement here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/27317

 

August 8, 2022

Next Columbia River Treaty Negotiations to be held in B.C. on August 10-11, 2022

The 13th round of negotiations to modernize the Columbia River Treaty will take place on August 10 and 11, with representatives of Canada and the United States meeting in Richmond. The two-day session is the first formal negotiation between the two countries since January 2022.

Read the Information Bulletin here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/27296

To stay updated on the latest Columbia River Treaty news, follow the Columbia River Treaty on Facebook or Twitter or subscribe to the Province’s Treaty newsletter.

 

May 27, 2022

Discussions continue on the Columbia River Treaty

The Province of B.C. has issued an update on recent discussions between Canada and the U.S. on modernizing the Columbia River Treaty. Representatives from both countries have met informally four times since March 2022 to discuss ways of advancing negotiations and seek clarification on issues related to each country’s initial proposals, tabled in 2020.

During the meeting on May 17, 2022, the U.S. presented a new proposal, which includes a framework for operations and addresses flood-risk management, hydropower coordination, ecosystem cooperation, and Canadian operational flexibility.

Read the full update here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/26878

 

April 28, 2022

Province to host two public information sessions on the Columbia River Treaty

The Province of B.C. is excited to announce two virtual information sessions on the Columbia River Treaty taking place May 16 and June 15, 2022. The first event will feature the latest news about negotiations between Canada and the U.S. and describe the process for modernizing the Treaty in both countries. The second event will provide an overview of Indigenous-led research that is informing Canadian discussions about how Treaty operations could be changed to improve Columbia Basin ecosystems. Both sessions will be held by Zoom with the option to phone in for those not able to connect online.

Questions from the public are encouraged, either live during the sessions or submitted in advance by May 8, 2022.

Register and learn more on the Columbia River Treaty Info Sessions page.

 

March 16, 2022

Province seeks Columbia Basin Regional Advisory Committee member based in Creston

The Columbia Basin Regional Advisory Committee has an opening for a citizen representative in Creston, B.C. Residents interested in helping inform potential future improvements to the Columbia River Treaty and domestic hydroelectric operations in the Columbia Basin are invited to submit a short application before 11:59 p.m. local time on Sunday, April 10, 2022.

For more information on the committee and how to apply, visit the Columbia Basin Regional Advisory Committee webpage.

 

February 10, 2022

The B.C. Columbia River Treaty Team has published a summary of responses to an agriculture discussion paper issued last summer. The paper sought input on whether there are remaining gaps in addressing Treaty-related agriculture interests in the Basin, given available programs and initiatives.

Comments were received from a small number of farmers, ranchers and industry experts outlining challenges facing the Basin agriculture sector and areas for improvement.

Further input is welcomed and encouraged. This is part of the B.C. Treaty Team’s ongoing commitment to exploring ways of enhancing Basin agriculture support in areas affected by the Columbia River Treaty. Hearing from those involved in Basin food production is a critical part of this process.

For more information and to read the report, please visit the Columbia River Treaty Agriculture Discussion Paper page.

 

January 12, 2022

Canada and the U.S. met for the 12th round of negotiations to modernize the Columbia River Treaty on January 10, 2022.

Building on discussions that occurred during the previous round in December 2021, the one-day virtual session focused on evolving concepts for post-2024 flood risk management, Canada’s desire for more operational flexibility, and mechanisms for achieving ecosystem objectives.

The Canadian negotiating team, which includes representatives from the governments of Canada, B.C. and the Ktunaxa, Secwepemc and Syilx Okanagan Nations, continues its strong collaboration on activities that are informing these historic discussions.

As negotiations progress, the Province maintains its engagement with Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations, residents and local governments to ensure Basin interests are reflected in a modernized Treaty.

The next round of negotiations will take place in the near future. Read the Information Bulletin here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/26077

To stay updated on the latest Columbia River Treaty news, follow the Columbia River Treaty on Facebook or Twitter or subscribe to the Province’s Treaty newsletter.

 

December 13, 2021

Canada and the United States met on December 9, 2021 to advance talks on the modernization of the Columbia River Treaty. During this round, negotiators discussed ecosystem priorities, post-2024 flood risk management, and Canada’s flexibility concept.

On behalf of Canada, Canadian Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations made a presentation to the United States about ongoing ecosystem studies and analysis, as did United States federal agencies and tribal advisors, similarly presenting to Canada. B.C. led a discussion about increasing flexibility in the Treaty.

This session expanded the conversation around each country’s key interests, building on proposals for a modernized agreement that were tabled by Canada and the U.S. during the two rounds of talks in 2020.

The next round of negotiations will take place on Monday, January 10, 2022.

Read the Information Bulletin here: https://news.gov.bc.ca/25948

To stay updated on the latest Columbia River Treaty news, follow the Columbia River Treaty on Facebook or Twitter or subscribe to the Province’s Treaty newsletter.

 

November 29, 2021

Canada and the United States have confirmed the next round of discussions on the future of the Columbia River Treaty. Negotiators will meet virtually on December 9, 2021 to advance talks about key issues such as flood risk management, hydroelectric power generation and ecosystems.

In a statement released today, Katrine Conroy, the Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, said “I am pleased to see these discussions moving forward and am confident that, as long as both Canada and the United States recognize the value in continuing to create and equitably share benefits between our two countries, we will be successful in modernizing the Treaty.”

Read Minister Conroy’s statement: https://news.gov.bc.ca/25843

To stay updated on the latest Columbia River Treaty news, follow the Columbia River Treaty on Facebook or Twitter or subscribe to the Province’s Treaty newsletter.

 

October 21, 2021

Province seeks CBRAC member based in Golden

The Columbia Basin Regional Advisory Committee has another opening for a citizen representative, this time in Golden, B.C. Interested Golden residents with knowledge of the Basin and a desire to advise on Columbia River Treaty issues and domestic hydroelectric operations are invited to submit a short application before 11:59pm local time Sunday, November 7, 2021.

In addition, the application period for Revelstoke and Cranbrook/Kimberley positions has been extended until Sunday, October 24, 2021.

For more information on the committee and how to apply, visit: https://engage.gov.bc.ca/columbiarivertreaty/columbia-basin-regional-advisory-committee/

 

October 19, 2021

A report summarizing the Province of B.C.’s February 2021 Columbia River Treaty Virtual Town Hall is out today. Serving as a companion piece to a recording of the event posted to YouTube in February, 2021, the report provides details of each presentation along with answers to more than 60 questions asked before and during the session.

Find the report and Q+A appendix on the 2021 Public Engagement page.

 

October 4, 2021

Province seeks CBRAC members based in Revelstoke and Cranbrook/Kimberley

The Province of B.C. is seeking expressions of interest for Revelstoke and Cranbrook/Kimberley positions on the Columbia Basin Regional Advisory Committee, a diverse, basin-wide group that helps inform potential future improvements to the Columbia River Treaty and domestic hydroelectric operations in the Columbia Basin. Applications will be accepted until 11:59pm local time on October 17, 2021.

For more information on the committee and how to apply, visit https://engage.gov.bc.ca/columbiarivertreaty/columbia-basin-regional-advisory-committee/

 

September 7, 2021

Legislators and business leaders from the Pacific Northwest states and western Canada met in person and online for the Pacific NorthWest Economic Region (PNWER) 30th Annual Summit held August 15-19 in Big Sky, Montana. Recordings of the 2021 PNWER sessions are now available.

At the Summit, the Honourable Minister Katrine Conroy, the Minister responsible for the Columbia River Treaty and Sylvain Fabi, Canada’s Chief Negotiator for the Treaty, provided their perspectives on the modernization of the Columbia River Treaty during PNWER’s “Water Infrastructure and Policy” session.

The session’s theme was to provide a broad overview of key issues and update on the current status of the Columbia River Treaty Negotiations, and to consider transboundary waters more generally. Other speakers included U.S. Senator Mike Cuffe and Professor Reed Benson from the University of New Mexico.

A full recording of the “Water Infrastructure and Policy” session can be viewed online at the link: https://vimeo.com/596088895

Additional information is available on the PNWER 2021 Annual Summit website.

 

July 6, 2021

Several U.S. NGOs have written a letter extending their thanks to the governments of B.C., Canada and the Ktunaxa, Secwepemc and Syilx Okanagan Nations, for their engagement with Basin citizens on the modernization of the Columbia River Treaty.

In the letter, they express appreciation for regular public meetings, B.C.’s comprehensive Treaty website, newsletters and media articles, as well as the Columbia Basin Regional Advisory Committee. They also applaud the work of the  CRT Local Governments Committee. Read the full letter here.

 

June 18, 2021

The B.C. Columbia River Treaty Team has published a new discussion paper summarizing programs and initiatives available to the Columbia Basin agriculture sector, and is seeking feedback to learn where there may be gaps.

Throughout the Province’s public engagement on the Columbia River Treaty, Basin residents have spoken of agricultural losses sustained when valley bottoms were first inundated after construction of the Treaty dams.  Many people have indicated that increased support is needed for areas such as accessing land, financial aid for sustainable farming, irrigation, and dikes.

To help respond to these concerns, the B.C. Columbia River Treaty Team investigated existing federal, provincial and regional agriculture programs and initiatives with the potential to help address some of these interests. Over 40 programs were identified, which have been compiled in the discussion paper.

Individuals and organizations involved in Columbia Basin agriculture are invited to provide feedback on whether there are gaps in addressing agriculture interests or concerns, given the programs and initiatives listed in the discussion paper. Feedback is invited until September 15, 2021 at 4 p.m. PT.

Visit the Columbia Basin Agriculture Discussion Paper page for full details.

 

May 20, 2021

The Province of B.C.’s Columbia River Treaty Team has released a report responding to a proposal to build a weir/dam on Koocanusa Reservoir. The report provides key details of the preliminary feasibility study by BGC Engineering Inc., a description of the public engagement process, a summary of questions and feedback received, and the Province’s conclusion.

Visit the Koocanusa Weir Feasibility Study page for full details.

 

May 12, 2021

In the mid-1960s, a Permanent Engineering Board (PEB) was established under the Columbia River Treaty, composed of two members appointed by Canada and two by the United States. The board’s responsibilities include assembling flow records and helping settle any Treaty-related disagreements that might arise between the two countries. PEB is required to create annual reports of the results being achieved to the governments of the U.S. and Canada, which they have done since 1965.

The latest report, which describes Treaty projects, storage operations, and the resulting benefits achieved by Canada and the United States between Oct. 1, 2019, and Sept. 30, 2020, is now available at

https://www.nwd.usace.army.mil/CRWM/PEB/CRT-Documents/

 

February 5, 2021

The Province will be hosting a Virtual Town Hall on the Columbia River Treaty, Feb. 24, 2021 from 6pm – 8:15pm Pacific Time, 7pm – 9:15pm Mountain Time.

People from across the Columbia Basin and beyond will have a chance to hear from, and ask questions to, Canadian negotiators, Indigenous Nations, local government representatives and others involved in current efforts to modernize the transboundary Treaty.

Topics will not only include the current Canada-U.S. negotiations, but also ongoing Indigenous Nations-led ecosystem studies, Local Governments’ Committee updated recommendations and work underway domestically to address interests related to the Treaty.

The session will be held by Zoom, with an option to phone in for those who are not able to connect by web. A recording will be available afterwards.

Visit the Province’s Columbia River Treaty Public Engagement page for full details.

 

January 28, 2021

The Columbia River Treaty Local Governments Committee has released their updated recommendations to the Governments of B.C. and Canada and Basin Indigenous Nations on the future of the Treaty and related domestic issues. The Committee shared their initial recommendations in 2013 and has incorporated feedback from Basin residents and local governments in this updated version. B.C. has been engaging closely with the Local Governments Committee since work on reviewing and modernizing the Treaty began in 2011. Visit the Local Governments Committee website and click the “Our Recommendations” tab to read the updated recommendations.

 

December 18, 2020

Following the October 2020 B.C. election, Katrine Conroy was reappointed to her role as Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty. As 2020 draws to a close, Minister Conroy shares her thoughts on this year’s Treaty developments, and progress that has been made, despite the challenges of this unique year. https://news.gov.bc.ca/23469

 

June 30, 2020

The tenth round of Columbia River Treaty negotiations between Canada and the United States was conducted by web-conference, on June 29 and 30, 2020.

During the most recent round of discussions, Canada responded to a framework proposed by the United States during the previous round of negotiations in Washington D.C. and tabled a Canadian proposal outlining a framework for a modernized Columbia River Treaty, developed collaboratively by Canada, B.C. and Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations.

Due to the confidential nature of the cross-border negotiations, details of Canada’s initial proposal and of the U.S. framework cannot be made public.

The tabling of proposals is one part of a complex negotiation process. The exchange of options between countries will take time. Once the process is sufficiently advanced and options become clear, the Province of B.C. will engage Canadian Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations, local governments, citizens and stakeholders on decisions regarding a modernized treaty.

The next round of negotiation meetings has not been scheduled.

To keep up with the latest Columbia River Treaty news, sign up for the newsletter at https://engage.gov.bc.ca/columbiarivertreaty/sign-up/ or follow the CRT on Facebook (@ColumbiaRiverTreaty) or Twitter (@CRTreaty).

To share views on the Treaty, email columbiarivertreaty@gov.bc.ca

 

April 23, 2020

Kathy Eichenberger, Executive Director of the Provincial Columbia River Treaty Team, has shared the following message about how work on the Treaty is proceeding during the COVID-19 pandemic:

 

As the situation around COVID-19 evolves, work on the Columbia River Treaty continues.

Though the next round of Canada-U.S. negotiations has not yet been scheduled, Canada, B.C. and Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations are collaborating through remote technology to refine Canadian positions and advance ecosystem function work.

The provincial Columbia River Treaty Team is also focused on addressing Treaty-related community interests, finalizing the summary report for last fall’s Columbia Basin community meetings, and exploring new ways of connecting with Basin residents.

Our thanks to all of you who are navigating this challenging time with patience and understanding.  We also deeply appreciate the resolve of our Indigenous Nations and federal government partners to keep moving forward with the Treaty modernization process.

The Province remains committed to engaging with Indigenous Nations, local governments and Basin residents on the Treaty and Treaty-related interests.  However, we recognize that the main concern for British Columbians right now is the health and safety of their families and communities.  With that in mind, a number of public engagement plans for this spring have been postponed and timelines have been shifted.

We will continue providing updates on the B.C. Columbia River Treaty website, Facebook, Twitter, and through our newsletter, the next issue of which will be out in May.  We also welcome questions and comments by phone or email.  If there comes a time when we need to connect with Basin citizens on specific Treaty-related matters before the current health concerns subside, we will look at ways of doing that remotely, ensuring an inclusive process.

In the meantime, we are staying in touch with the Local Governments’ Committee and the Columbia Basin Regional Advisory Committee when there is news to share and issues to discuss. Katrine Conroy, Minister Responsible for the Treaty, is also in regular contact with the B.C. Treaty Team.

Throughout the Province’s public engagement on Treaty matters, we have taken every opportunity to connect with Basin residents face-to-face and to make our presence felt in the communities most affected by the Treaty.  While the current situation has made it necessary to put a pause on in-person activities, please know that B.C.’s Columbia River Treaty Team is still here and working hard for the Basin.

On behalf of the B.C. Columbia River Treaty Team, I wish you all good health.

Kathy Eichenberger

Executive Director of the Provincial Columbia River Treaty Team

Download PDF

 

March 18, 2020

The ninth round of talks about modernizing the Columbia River Treaty took place in Washington, D.C., on March 11 and 12, 2020. At this latest session, Canada and the U.S. entered a new phase of negotiations.

“The negotiations so far have really been about Canada and the U.S. getting to know each other’s priorities and positions around various things relating to the Treaty,” said Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty. “They are at a point now of getting into the nitty gritty and the details of it all. The conversations are getting more specific and challenging.”

Negotiators advanced their discussion of priorities such as flood-risk management, power generation and ecosystem function. As at the previous two rounds of negotiations, Canadian Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations participated as official observers.

Consistent with the advice of the B.C. Provincial Health Officer, the B.C. public servants who participated in negotiations in Washington, D.C., are self-isolating for 14 days after returning to Canada.

Read a statement from @KatrineConroy at https://news.gov.bc.ca/21793

The next round of negotiation meetings will be scheduled in the near future.

 

February 6, 2020

The United States Department of State has advised that next round of Columbia River Treaty negotiations will take place on March 11 and 12, 2020, in Washington, D.C. This will be the ninth round of talks since Canada and the U.S. began discussions on modernizing the Treaty in May 2018. The last round was held in ?aq’am, near Cranbrook, B.C., in September 2019.

 

September 16, 2019

Canadian and U.S. negotiators returned to the B.C. Columbia Basin last week for two days of meetings in ?aq’am, near Cranbrook, to discuss the future of the Columbia River Treaty.

On behalf of the Canadian delegation, the Ktunaxa, Secwepemc and Syilx/Okanagan Nations made a presentation on ecosystem goals and objectives in the Canadian Columbia Basin, as well as on the collaboration between Indigenous, provincial and federal governments on exploring the reintroduction of salmon in the Upper Columbia. At this meeting, the U.S. delegation was joined by expert advisers representing U.S. Tribes, who provided expertise regarding the extensive ecosystem work that the U.S. has undertaken in the basin, including transboundary efforts.

Building on previous meetings, negotiators discussed issues related to ecosystem co-operation, flood-risk management and hydro power. To read a news release on the latest round of negotiations, visit https://news.gov.bc.ca/20602.

The next round of negotiations is scheduled to take place in the United States on Nov. 19 and 20, 2019.

 

June 24, 2019

Negotiators representing Canada (including British Columbia) and the United States returned to Washington, D.C. on June 19 and 20, 2019 to continue discussions on modernizing the Columbia River Treaty. This was the first meeting where Canadian Columbia Basin Indigenous Nations participated as official observers, following Foreign Affairs Canada’s historic announcement in April.

During this round of meetings, negotiators took stock of the progress that has been made since negotiations began in May 2018, and continued discussions on flood risk management, power and adaptive management.

The next round of negotiation meetings will return to the Columbia Basin, taking place in Cranbrook, B.C., September 10 and 11, 2019.

To read a statement on the latest round of negotiations from Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, visit https://news.gov.bc.ca/20079.


Indigenous Nations to participate as observers at Canada-U.S. Columbia River Treaty negotiations

April 26, 2019

The Honourable Chrystia Freeland, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada, has announced that representatives of the Ktunaxa, Okanagan and Secwepemc Nations will now participate as observers at the Canada-U.S. Columbia River Treaty negotiations.

Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, expressed her strong support for this decision: “Our government applauds Canada’s inclusion of Indigenous Nations in the Canada-U.S. Columbia River Treaty negotiations. Indigenous Nations have been collaborating with the governments of B.C. and Canada on negotiation positions and strategies, and now the relationship has been strengthened. This is an important and unprecedented step in demonstrating our commitment to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to our journey towards reconciliation.”

https://www.canada.ca/en/global-affairs/news/2019/04/federal-government-announces-columbia-river-basin-indigenous-nations-to-participate-as-observers-in-columbia-river-treaty-negotiations.html

 

April 12, 2019

On April 10 and 11, 2019, negotiators representing Canada (including British Columbia) and the United States met in Victoria B.C. for the latest round of discussions on modernizing the Columbia River Treaty. The two-day session marked the first time that negotiators have met in B.C.’s capital since negotiations began last year. Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, welcomed the negotiating teams with an opening address on the first day.

Negotiators continued discussions on flood-risk management and hydro power co-ordination. Canada also raised the topics of other Treaty benefits and adaptive management. The negotiators have agreed to conduct technical work between negotiating rounds, to support the progress of discussions.

The next round of negotiation meetings will take place in in Washington, D.C., on June 19 and 20, 2019.

To read Minister Katrine Conroy’s statement on this week’s meetings visit: https://news.gov.bc.ca/19425

 

February 28, 2019

On Feb. 27 and 28, 2019, negotiators representing Canada (including British Columbia) and the United States met in Washington, D.C., to continue discussions on modernizing the Columbia River Treaty. These meetings continue a process that began in May 2018 in Washington, D.C. and was followed by further negotiation sessions in Nelson, B.C., Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, B.C.

Building on the work done at previous meetings, negotiators advanced the discussions on potential paths forward on flood risk management and hydropower co-ordination through frank conversations regarding operations and benefits. The next round of negotiation meetings will take place in Victoria, B.C. April 10-11.

To read a statement on the latest negotiation meetings from Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, visit https://news.gov.bc.ca/19076

 

December 14, 2018

Negotiators representing Canada (including B.C.) and the United States convened for their fourth meeting in Vancouver, B.C. December 12 – 13, to resume discussions on modernization of the Columbia River Treaty. Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, issued this statement, summarizing this year’s activities.

Discussions on the future of the treaty will resume in early 2019, when negotiators return to Washington, D.C., on Feb. 27 and 28, 2019.

 

October 31, 2018

In May, 2018, negotiators representing the governments of Canada (including British Columbia) and the United States met in Washington, D.C., to formally launch discussions about the future of the Columbia River Treaty. In August, a second session took place in Nelson, British Columbia, and the third session took place in Portland, Oregon, during the month of October. The next session is scheduled for December 12 and 13 in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, issued this statement following the most recent meeting in Portland.

In June 2018, the Province relaunched its engagement with the public on the treaty through a series of community meetings. These took place in Meadow Creek, Jaffray, Creston, Castlegar, Nelson, Valemount, Revelstoke, Golden and Nakusp. The meetings provided an update on treaty negotiations with the U.S.; a summary of work B.C. and Canada have been doing to prepare for negotiations; a review of the input received during the Province’s 2012-2013 Public Consultation; and a discussion on priority issues that should be included in treaty negotiations. Common priorities included: ecosystem restoration; agriculture, recreation, and tourism enhancement; the value of flood control; the importance of First Nation involvement in negotiations; and the desire for broader community engagement, especially focusing on youth. A full report of these meetings is scheduled to be released later this year.

Following the August negotiation sessions in Nelson, Minister Conroy said, “I am optimistic and know that collaboration between our two countries is the key to future success. Working together, I’m confident that we can create a better treaty, and ensure it continues to maximize benefits for Canada and the U.S., while sharing them equitably.”

 

May 22, 2018

The Honourable Chrystia Freeland, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada, announced today that Canada and the United States will launch negotiations on May 29, 2018, to renew the Columbia River Treaty. Katrine Conroy, B.C.’s Minister Responsible for the Columbia River Treaty, issued a statement in support of this announcement.

The U.S. Department of State has also issued a press release announcing the start of negotiations.

 

April 25, 2018

Negotiations between Canada and the United States on modernizing the Columbia River Treaty are expected to begin this Spring or Summer.

The Governments of BC and Canada have been working closely together, in consultation with Indigenous Nations and local governments, to prepare for these upcoming negotiations.

In March 2014, following extensive Indigenous Nations consultation and community engagement, and after conducting a number of technical studies, the Government of British Columbia announced its decision to continue the Columbia River Treaty and seek improvements within the existing framework. This decision is supported by the Government of Canada.

In December 2013 the U.S. Entity delivered its final recommendations to the U.S. Department of State. In the fall of 2016, the U.S. Department of State completed its review of the final recommendations and decided to proceed with negotiations to modernize the Treaty.